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Millennium Music Profile: The Curse of Frank Black - George Frideric Handel

This page is an introduction to George Frideric Handel whose music was used during the Millennium episode The Curse of Frank Black. A complete list of all music by George Frideric Handel that was used throughout Millennium is also listed below. Our Millennium Music Guide is based on detailed profiles for each artist, band or composer and their music which was used in a specific episode (sometimes more than one). Here you can learn more about the music and the people that created the music, including where available a description of the scenes in which their music can be heard.

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Music Profile Info

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Artist Details

Artist:

George Frideric Handel.



Origin:

Halle, Germany


Genre:

Baroque

Active:

Born 23 February 1685 - Died 14 April 1759.



Millennium Episode Details

Episode Title:

 The Curse of Frank Black



MLM Code:

#MLM-207


Production Code:

5C07


Season:

2


Original Airdate:

1997-10-31

Episode Summary:

Frank Black faces an eerie night full of unsettling coincidences when he takes Jordan to the streets of Seattle for some Halloween Trick-or-Treating. Are these coincidences the result of simple chance, or is someone -- or something -- trying to give Frank a powerful message?

Main Crew:

Written by Glen Morgan & James Wong
Directed by Ralph Hemecker
Edited by Chris Willingham, A.C.E.

Random stills from The Curse of Frank Black:

A random image from this Millennium episode
 
A random image from this Millennium episode
 
A random image from this Millennium episode
 

There are a total of 145 images for this episode of Millennium which are available here.

Awards and Nominations:

This episode of Millennium did not receive any Nominations or Awards.

 

Music by George Frideric Handel used in the Millennium episode The Curse of Frank Black

 
An image related to George Frideric Handel whose music was used in Millennium.

George Frideric Handel (23 February 1685 - 14 April 1759) was a German Baroque composer who was a leading composer of concerti grossi, operas and oratorios. Born in Germany as Georg Friederich Händel, he lived most of his adult life in England, becoming a subject of the British crown on 22nd of January 1727. His most famous work is Messiah, an oratorio set to texts from the King James Bible; other well-known works are Water Music and Music for the Royal Fireworks. He deeply influenced many of the composers who came after him, including Haydn, Mozart, and Beethoven, and his work helped lead the transition from the Baroque to the Classical era.


 

Where George Frideric Handel can be heard in The Curse of Frank Black

The Millennium episode The Curse of Frank Black contains the following music by George Frideric Handel:

  • Suite for Harpsichord (Suite de piece), Vol.2, No.4 in D minor, HWV 437 Sarabande (Mark Snow version)

    Heard as part of Mark Snow's music score after the scene where the security guards drive away (DVD time code 31 mins and 5 secs). Mark Snow's version of Suite for Harpsichord (Suite de piece), Vol.2, No.4 in D minor, HWV 437 Sarabande can be heard as Frank reads his bible and discovers the line, "Why should it be thought incredible by you that God raises the dead?".

    It can also be heard without the Harpsichord in the final scene (DVD time code 40mins 50secs) when Frank returns to the yellow house to wipe off the egg from his windows.


George Frideric Handel - additional music heard in Millennium

Millennium's producers would occasionally use additional music from the same artist, band or composer. Sometimes a track or song could be heard in more than one episode of the series.

Music from George Frideric Handel was used in a total of 1 episode/s of Millennium. Below is a complete list of all music by George Frideric Handel heard throughout the series and the episodes in which it was used, including links to the relevant music and episode profiles:



About George Frideric Handel

Handel was born in Halle at Saxony-Anhalt to Georg and Dorothea (neacute;e Taust) Händel in 1685, the same year that both Johann Sebastian Bach and Domenico Scarlatti were born. He displayed considerable musical talent at an early age; by the age of seven he was a skilful performer on the harpsichord and organ, and at nine he began to compose music. However, his father, an eminent barber-surgeon who served as valet and barber to the Courts of Saxony and Brandenburg, as well as a distinguished citizen of Halle, was opposed to George Frideric pursuing a musical career, preferring him to study law, whereas his mother, Dorothea, encouraged him in his music.

In 1702, in obedience to his father's wishes, he began the study of law at the University of Halle, but after his father's death the following year, he abandoned law for music, becoming the organist at the Protestant Cathedral. The following year he moved to Hamburg, accepting a position as violinist and harpsichordist in the orchestra of the opera-house. Here his first two operas, Almira and Nero, were produced early in 1705. Two other early operas, Daphne and Florindo, were produced at Hamburg in 1708. During the years 1707-1709 Handel traveled and studied in Italy. When opera was banned by local authorities, Handel found work as a composer of sacred music and wrote some pieces in operatic style. The famous Dixit Dominus (1707) is from this era. His Rodrigo was produced in Florence in 1707, and his Agrippina at Venice in 1708. Two oratorios, La Resurrezione and Il Trionfo del Tempo, were produced at Rome in 1709 and 1710, respectively.

In 1710 Handel became Kapellmeister to George, Elector of Hanover, who would soon be King George I of Great Britain. He visited London in 1710 and settled there permanently in 1712, receiving a yearly income of £200 from Queen Anne.

In 1723 Handel moved into a newly built house in Brook Street, London, where he rented until his death 36 years later. The Handel House Museum is now a restored Georgian house open to the public with an events programme of Baroque music.

In 1726 Handel's opera Scipio (Scipione) was performed for the first time, the march from which remains the regimental slow march of the British Grenadier Guards. He was naturalised a British subject in the following year.

In 1727 Handel was commissioned to write four anthems for the coronation ceremony of King George II. One of these, Zadok the Priest, has been also played at every coronation ceremony since. Handel was director of the Royal Academy of Music 1720-1728, and a partner of J. J. Heidegger in the management of the King's Theatre 1729-1734. Handel also had a long association with the Royal Opera House at Covent Garden, where many of his Italian operas were premièred. Handel gave up operatic management entirely in 1740, after he had lost a fortune in the business.

In April 1737, aged 52, he suffered a stroke or other injury which left his right arm temporarily paralysed and stopped him from performing. He also complained that he had trouble focusing after the event.

In 1750 Handel arranged a performance of The Messiah in aid of the Foundling Hospital. In recognition of his patronage Handel was made a governor of the Hospital bequeathing to it a collection of his manuscripts including a fair copy of The Messiah.

In August, 1750, on a journey back from Germany to London, Handel was seriously injured in a carriage accident between The Hague and Haarlem in the Netherlands.

In 1751 he started turning blind, and by age 65 was completely blind in one eye. The cause was unknown and progressed into his other eye as well. He died some eight years later in London, his last attended performance being his own Messiah. He had more than 3,000 mourners attending at his funeral which was given full state honours and was buried in Westminster Abbey. Handel never married, and kept his personal life very private. Unlike many composers, he left a sizeable estate at his death, worth £20,000, the bulk of which he left to a niece in Germany, as well as leaving gifts to his other relations, servants, friends and favourite charities.

Handel has generally been accorded a high esteem from fellow composers, both in his own time and since. Bach apparently said "[Handel] is the only person I would wish to see before I die, and the only person I would wish to be, were I not Bach." Mozart is reputed to have said of him "Handel understands effect better than any of us. When he chooses, he strikes like a thunder bolt", and to Beethoven he was "the master of us all", and emphasised above all, the simplicity and popular appeal of Handel's music when he said "go to him to learn how to achieve great effects, by such simple means".

Nevertheless, the young Handel was permitted to take lessons in musical composition and keyboard techniques from Friedrich Wilhelm Zachau, the organist of the Liebfrauenkirche, Halle. His aunt, Anna, had given him a spinet (early harpsichord with a single keyboard and only one string for each note) for his seventh birthday, which they moved into the attic and he went there to play it whenever he could.


Song 1: Suite for Harpsichord (Suite de piece), Vol.2, No.4 in D minor, HWV 437 Sarabande (Mark Snow version)


Suite for Harpsichord (Suite de piece), Vol.2, No.4 in D minor, HWV 437 Sarabande (Mark Snow version) by George Frideric Handel.

Album Title:
Greatest Hits Handel (CD 1994)
Greatest Hits of 1720 (CD 1990)


Scene:
Suite for Harpsichord (Suite de piece), Vol.2, No.4 in D minor, HWV 437 Sarabande (Mark Snow version) can be heard during the following scenes in the Millennium episode The Curse of Frank Black:

Heard as part of Mark Snow's music score after the scene where the security guards drive away (DVD time code 31 mins and 5 secs). Mark Snow's version of Suite for Harpsichord (Suite de piece), Vol.2, No.4 in D minor, HWV 437 Sarabande can be heard as Frank reads his bible and discovers the line, "Why should it be thought incredible by you that God raises the dead?".

It can also be heard without the Harpsichord in the final scene (DVD time code 40mins 50secs) when Frank returns to the yellow house to wipe off the egg from his windows.



Listen to Suite for Harpsichord (Suite de piece), Vol.2, No.4 in D minor, HWV 437 Sarabande (Mark Snow version)

The following video clip relates to Suite for Harpsichord (Suite de piece), Vol.2, No.4 in D minor, HWV 437 Sarabande (Mark Snow version) by George Frideric Handel:



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Official Website:

Sorry, no official website exists or is currently stored for George Frideric Handel. If you are aware of an official website for this artist, please contact us and we'll add it to this page.


Other Websites:

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With grateful thanks to the following sources:

Wikipedia contributors, "George Frideric Handel," Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George Frideric Handel