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Millennium Music Profile: Roosters - Richard Wagner

This page is an introduction to Richard Wagner whose music was used during the Millennium episode Roosters. A complete list of all music by Richard Wagner that was used throughout Millennium is also listed below. Our Millennium Music Guide is based on detailed profiles for each artist, band or composer and their music which was used in a specific episode (sometimes more than one). Here you can learn more about the music and the people that created the music, including where available a description of the scenes in which their music can be heard.

You can learn more and discuss the music heard in Millennium within the dedicated music section of our This is who we are - Millennium community forums.


 

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Artist Details

Artist:

Richard Wagner.



Origin:

Leipzig, Saxony District in Germany


Genre:

Classical (Romantic)

Active:

Born May 22, 1813 - Died February 13, 1883.



Millennium Episode Details

Episode Title:

 Roosters



MLM Code:

#MLM-216


Production Code:

5C16


Season:

2


Original Airdate:

1998-03-13

Episode Summary:

It is discovered that Millennium Group dissidents are not those responsible for taking the cross of Christ’s crucifixion. In actuality, a sinister third party, a group of Nazis known as Odessa, are the ones to blame for killing Group members, taking the cross, and trying to pull the Black family into their midst. Only the Group’s leading Old Man and the two recently expelled candidates, Frank and Lara, can bring this evidence into the open and pull things back together in time... before there is no more Millennium Group.

Main Crew:

Written by Glen Morgan & James Wong
Directed by Thomas J. Wright
Edited by Chris Willingham, A.C.E.

Random stills from Roosters:

A random image from this Millennium episode
 
A random image from this Millennium episode
 
A random image from this Millennium episode
 

There are a total of 150 images for this episode of Millennium which are available here.

Awards and Nominations:

This episode of Millennium did not receive any Nominations or Awards.

 

Music by Richard Wagner used in the Millennium episode Roosters

 
An image related to Richard Wagner whose music was used in Millennium.

Wilhelm Richard Wagner (May 22, 1813 - February 13, 1883) was a German composer, conductor, music theorist, and essayist, primarily known for his operas (or "music dramas" as he later came to call them). Unlike most other great opera composers, Wagner always wrote the scenario and libretto for his works himself.

Wagner's compositions, particularly those of his later period, are notable for their contrapuntal texture, rich chromaticism, harmonies and orchestration, and elaborate use of leitmotifs: musical themes associated with specific characters, locales, or plot elements. Wagner pioneered advances in musical language including extreme chromaticism and atonality which greatly influenced the development of European classical music.

He transformed musical thought through his idea of Gesamtkunstwerk ("total artwork"), the synthesis of all the poetic, visual, musical and dramatic arts, epitomized by his monumental four-opera cycle Der Ring des Nibelungen (1876). Wagner even went so far as to build his own opera-house to try to stage these works as he had imagined them.


 

Where Richard Wagner can be heard in Roosters

The Millennium episode Roosters contains the following music by Richard Wagner:

  • Parsifal (An Opera), Prelude to Act I

    Heard during the following scene (from the episode transcript):

    [The yellow house - night. In the basement, The Old Man switches on a cassette player.]

    THE OLD MAN: You know this? [pause] Wagner's Parsifal. A young man is brought to the site of the Holy Grail, but he don't quite get it. So he wanders around acquiring wisdom and experience until he becomes king of the knights.

    [The Old Man is talking to Lara.]
    THE OLD MAN: I hear this every night before I go to bed. Well, parts of it. The damn thing's five hours long or somethin'. [he listens] Ain't it beautiful? [sighs] But even so, for me, it's tarnished. When Adolph Hitler made a personal pilgrimage to Wagner's grave, emotional, he believed he could make a religion out of Parsifal. [pause] And, unfortunately, he did.


    It can also be heard later during The Old Man's funeral, throughout the episode's final scenes.


Richard Wagner - additional music heard in Millennium

Millennium's producers would occasionally use additional music from the same artist, band or composer. Sometimes a track or song could be heard in more than one episode of the series.

Music from Richard Wagner was used in a total of 1 episode/s of Millennium. Below is a complete list of all music by Richard Wagner heard throughout the series and the episodes in which it was used, including links to the relevant music and episode profiles:



About Richard Wagner

In 1877, Wagner moved to Acireale in Italy where he began work on Parsifal, his final opera. The composition took four years, during which he also wrote a series of increasingly reactionary essays on religion and art.

Wagner completed Parsifal in January 1882, and a second Bayreuth Festival was held for the new opera. Wagner was by this time extremely ill, having suffered through a series of increasingly severe angina attacks. During the sixteenth and final performance of Parsifal on August 29, he secretly entered the pit during Act III, took the baton from conductor Hermann Levi, and led the performance to its conclusion.

After the Festival, the Wagner family journeyed to Venice for the winter. On February 13, 1883, Richard Wagner died of a heart attack in the Palazzo Vendramin on the Grand Canal. His body was returned to Bayreuth and buried in the garden of the Villa Wahnfried.

Franz Liszt's memorable piece for pianoforte solo, La lugubre gondola, evokes the passing of a black-shrouded funerary gondola bearing Richard Wagner's remains over the Grand Canal.


Song 1: Parsifal (An Opera), Prelude to Act I


Parsifal (An Opera), Prelude to Act I by Richard Wagner.

Album Title:
Wagner: Overtures & Preludes (CD 1996)


Scene:
Parsifal (An Opera), Prelude to Act I can be heard during the following scenes in the Millennium episode Roosters:

Heard during the following scene (from the episode transcript):

[The yellow house - night. In the basement, The Old Man switches on a cassette player.]

THE OLD MAN: You know this? [pause] Wagner's Parsifal. A young man is brought to the site of the Holy Grail, but he don't quite get it. So he wanders around acquiring wisdom and experience until he becomes king of the knights.

[The Old Man is talking to Lara.]
THE OLD MAN: I hear this every night before I go to bed. Well, parts of it. The damn thing's five hours long or somethin'. [he listens] Ain't it beautiful? [sighs] But even so, for me, it's tarnished. When Adolph Hitler made a personal pilgrimage to Wagner's grave, emotional, he believed he could make a religion out of Parsifal. [pause] And, unfortunately, he did.


It can also be heard later during The Old Man's funeral, throughout the episode's final scenes.


Details:

Parsifal is an opera in three acts by Richard Wagner. It is loosely based on Wolfram von Eschenbach's Parzival, the medieval (13th century) epic poem of the Arthurian knight Parzival (Percival) and his quest for The Holy Grail. In Wagner's opera the hero Parsifal recovers the spear used to pierce Jesus Christ during his crucifixion. Wagner first conceived the work in April 1857 but it was not completed until twenty-five years later. The first production was in Bayreuth in 1882. Wagner preferred to describe Parsifal not as an opera, but as "ein Bühnenweihfestspiel" - "A Festival Play for the Consecration of the Stage".



Listen to Parsifal (An Opera), Prelude to Act I

The following video clip relates to Parsifal (An Opera), Prelude to Act I by Richard Wagner:



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Official Website:

Sorry, no official website exists or is currently stored for Richard Wagner. If you are aware of an official website for this artist, please contact us and we'll add it to this page.


Other Websites:

Sorry, we do not currently have any other stored websites for Richard Wagner. If you are aware of a quality website for this artist, please contact us and we'll add it to this page.


With grateful thanks to the following sources:

Wikipedia contributors, "Richard Wagner," Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richard_Wagner