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Millennium Music Profile: Seven and One - Mark Snow

This page is an introduction to Mark Snow whose music was used during the Millennium episode Seven and One. A complete list of all music by Mark Snow that was used throughout Millennium is also listed below. Our Millennium Music Guide is based on detailed profiles for each artist, band or composer and their music which was used in a specific episode (sometimes more than one). Here you can learn more about the music and the people that created the music, including where available a description of the scenes in which their music can be heard.

You can learn more and discuss the music heard in Millennium within the dedicated music section of our This is who we are - Millennium community forums.


 

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Music Profile Info

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Artist Details

Artist:

Mark Snow.



Origin:

New York City, New York, USA


Genre:

1971 onwards


Millennium Episode Details

Episode Title:

 Seven and One



MLM Code:

#MLM-319


Production Code:

3ABC19


Season:

3


Original Airdate:

1999-04-30

Episode Summary:

Frank Black, for the third time in his life, ends up on the receiving end of a series of disturbing Polaroid photographs. This time, however, he begins questioning his own sanity, for the digitally enhanced photos depict the victim of a horrible drowning accident and the face in the Polaroids is his own. Is a ruthless demon seeking to push him over the edge into madness? Frank’s painful childhood memories and the FBI’s opinions that he is a crazed man make it all the more difficult for him to confront the evil attempting to ruin him.

Main Crew:

Written by Chris Carter & Frank Spotnitz
Directed by Peter Markle
Edited by Lauren Schaffer

Random stills from Seven and One:

A random image from this Millennium episode
 
A random image from this Millennium episode
 
A random image from this Millennium episode
 

There are a total of 275 images for this episode of Millennium which are available here.

Awards and Nominations:

This episode of Millennium did not receive any Nominations or Awards.

 

Music by Mark Snow used in the Millennium episode Seven and One

 
An image related to Mark Snow whose music was used in Millennium.

Mark Snow's status as one of today's most innovative and successful film and television composers is only the latest element of a far-reaching and eclectic career in music. While Snow is perhaps best known for his theme and scores for The X-Files and Millennium, this Juilliard-trained musician's career has encompassed lush orchestral scoring, album production, classical performance, and five years as a co-founder of the legendary New York Rock N' Roll Ensemble (a band he formed in the late '60s with Juilliard roommate Michael Kamen, himself a much in-demand producer, studio musician, conductor, arranger, and film and television composer). He's been nominated for six Emmy awards (in five different categories) and has worked on many motion pictures, as well as virtually every type of dramatic television program in existence. His best-known work also includes The Oldest Living Confederate Widow Tells All, An American Story, and Something About Amelia. Mark Snow was born Martin Fulterman on 26 August 1946 in Brooklyn.


 

Where Mark Snow can be heard in Seven and One

The Millennium episode Seven and One contains the following music by Mark Snow:

  • Millennium: Closure

    Heard in the final scene of Seven and One as Frank and Emma recover and Frank voices his soliloquy.


Mark Snow - additional music heard in Millennium

Millennium's producers would occasionally use additional music from the same artist, band or composer. Sometimes a track or song could be heard in more than one episode of the series.

Music from Mark Snow was used in a total of 6 episode/s of Millennium. Below is a complete list of all music by Mark Snow heard throughout the series and the episodes in which it was used, including links to the relevant music and episode profiles:



About Mark Snow

The Brooklyn, New York native began studying piano at the age of ten, then moved on to both drums and oboe. Four years at Juilliard followed, where he studied with jazz arranger Hall Overton and oboist Melvin Kaplan, as well as 12-tone composer George Tremblay and composer Earl Hagan (best known for the theme of The Andy Griffith Show).

Yet at the same time, Snow found himself bitten by the rock n' roll bug. He found the perfect outlet for his wide-ranging talents and interests in the New York Rock N' Roll Ensemble, which he formed with Kamen to perform both innovative pop and purely classical music (Snow played both drums and oboe (although not at the same time!) in that band).

Snow left the band in 1973 and, after a brief period in record production, moved to Los Angeles in 1974 and began working as a film and television composer. His early successes in the field included episodes of the award-winning series Family, and the theme and episodic scores for the long-running Hart To Hart. Other work included Cagney and Lacey, Baghdad Cafe, and Crazy Like A Fox, as well as many TV movies and mini-series.

Snow's home studio, featuring a mind-boggling array of the latest electronic equipment, enables him to "audition" an entire score for producers and directors (and his very friendly dogs) in the comfort of his own backyard.


Song 1: Millennium: Closure



Scene:
Millennium: Closure can be heard during the following scenes in the Millennium episode Seven and One:

Heard in the final scene of Seven and One as Frank and Emma recover and Frank voices his soliloquy.


Details:

One of Mark Snow's most beautiful and haunting pieces of music which is accompanied by Frank Black's Soliloquy.



Listen to Millennium: Closure

The following video clip relates to Millennium: Closure by Mark Snow:



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Lyrics for Millennium: Closure:

The following lyrics are the property of the respective authors, artists and labels. The lyrics to Millennium: Closure are provided for educational and research purposes only. Please support Mark Snow by purchasing relevant CD's or legal music downloads.


Frank Black's Soliloquy


I've been given the gift of hindsight,
Of seeing in the Dark, and seeing how the Darkness of men's hearts and minds.

I know what Evil is.
I've seen it, felt it, tasted it,
Inhaled the demon breath of it's ancient Powers.

The same Powers that had been prophesied through history and which are now marshalling.
Who is witness to this?
Have we stopped listening, to the Prophets, the Seers and the Sayers?

I have misjudged my gift
If I see in the darkness it's because there is light,
and it is the light which guides me now,
the light that will not go out,
that will lead us out of the dark night,
if, we let ourselves feel this too.
It will protect me, as it protects those around me,
even as the ancient forces try to steal our breaths.

Seven years of trials and tribulations,
Seven plus one the Prophets tell us,
Is this; the end?
The last year of this peace,
or the beginning?

Frank Black,
"Seven And One".





Official Website:

Sorry, no official website exists or is currently stored for Mark Snow. If you are aware of an official website for this artist, please contact us and we'll add it to this page.


Other Websites:

The following other websites are listed for Mark Snow:

Biography at ASCAP: the American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers
Mark Snow - IMDB entry


With grateful thanks to the following sources:

Jem Aswad Biography at ASCAP: the American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers