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Libby

Elders (Admins)
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Everything posted by Libby

  1. Well, after reading Graham's description and seeing the various screenshots here, I really, really wanted to like this series. Almost everything about it looks good. But I just couldn't get into it, which is a pity. I think I've become so used to watching documentaries and video lectures that drama doesn't work very well for me these days.
  2. I've taken to writing passwords in a little notebook. One downside is that when I "tidy up" my den there's a risk that I put the notebook somewhere and then can't find it. But, as my son said, no-one can hack into pen and paper via the internet.
  3. It's almost Spring. So, obviously, time for the UK to have winter weather. Current warnings out for the whole of the UK: Loads of people, especially in Scotland and Scandinavia, are yet again scoffing at our ability to cope with weather conditions that are normal for them. But that's the point. It's normal for them to get snow and ice so they know how to deal with it. For the rest of us, though, this is a very abnormal weather condition, and we don't have snow chains for our vehicles. We don't have many snow ploughs because they'd just be sitting in a depot and only brought out for a couple of days every few years or so. The vehicles that grit the roads are just ordinary trucks, and it's the refuse collectors that are stood in the back and shovelling grit on to the road. And there's not much point in spreading salt, because the temperatures are too low and the snow is too dry. My nearest online weather station shows the local temperatures for the last 7 days: And I'm in the south, where we rarely get temperatures like these. But I'm ok. I heeded the warnings and got stocked up on the essentials - especially cake and chocolate.
  4. This afternoon, I've been watching TV, one show in particular. It's a British TV series called "Red Cap". The title is the nickname given to British military police because they wear red berets. Most of the episodes take place in a fictional German town where there's a large British military base. The show ran for two seasons (6 episodes each season, as is typical for British TV series) in 2003 and 2004. I have watched some episodes in recent times, but never made the connection until today. Actually, I think it was some aspects of the music that made me stop and check the credits. The creator was Patrick Harbinson. The show did make use of flashbacks to the crime; but there were moments of very haunting music, similar to what Mark Snow used on Millennium. I'm now stuck with trying to remember what episode(s) of Millennium had the music that got my attention. There's not much personal info on Patrick Harbinson on imdb, and no Wikipedia entry for him, so I went a-googling. And amongst the top few hits on google is this interview, posted here by Mark (ethsnafu) which is worth a re-read: https://millennium-thisiswhoweare.net/tiwwa/topic/24127-tiwwa-exclusive-interview-with-patrick-harbinson/
  5. I've now caught up the news. Wow! Joe is really doing so very well. Sending more positive vibes from across the pond.
  6. Thanks for the good wishes. I hit another bad patch a couple of months ago, but I’ve recently started feeling better. Got good meds from my helpful doctor. On the timey-wimey subject, earlier today I was idly wondering how old I’d be in another 15 years’ time. So I figured out that – ok, yes, I used a calculator – and that doesn’t seem too bad. But then I thought about my grandson, who turns 4 just after Christmas. Good grief! (said in my best British accent) – in 15 years’ time, he’ll probably be at university! Just as well I was already stretched out on my sofa, otherwise I’d have had to do a quick sit down. This time thing really is very strange.
  7. I’ve been mulling over this 15 year thing for a little while. I alternate between “OMG 15 years – seems like yesterday” and “OMG 15 years – seems like half a lifetime”. It’s said that time moves differently as one gets older; but I take the optimistic view that being older means treating time as one wishes. And however long 15 years feels like to me, it's the 15 years of quality that really matters. So, happy anniversary TIWWA.
  8. Currently, we have Storm Brian. Cue many British internetters riffing the Monty Python film: "He's not a storm. He's a very naughty breeze." Here are some photos (taken from http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-5003265/Storm-Brian-batters-Britain-70-mph-winds.html):
  9. I went on to Youtube this evening. For some strange reason that I can't fathom (given that there's no possibility of relevance to any cookies from other websites I've visited recently) this was a listed suggestion:
  10. I thought of posting here, having researched some of my family history, but decided otherwise. Because it's personal, and I don't want it automatically visible on the Twitter feed.
  11. Ooh, I clicked on "All Activity" and saw this: So obviously I had to do something about the number of replies, lest, you know.....
  12. A couple of animal-related pics. This one is from a Twitter account. Funny, but not sure if it's true. However, a good reminder that little creatures, either toddlers or pets, can end up in trouble if you're not alert to the multitude of possibilities. I used to be owned by cats. I'd like to get another cat, but I know I'd end up with one like this:
  13. Some time ago, I very carefully and specifically added the 4th of July to my electronic calendar so I could post something interesting here. In due time, a pop up reminder popped up. Could I remember what it was I wanted to post here? Could I heck. Well, it's taken me almost a week, but eventually a couple of brain cells connected. Now, I know the origins might be a bit contentious, but there is something about this song that, to this Brit at least, says something quintessential about our transpondian cousins. Royal Albert Hall in London:
  14. I don’t know how much of this was staged, nor how many takes were needed:
  15. A bit of French history: There was Napoleon the First, and Napoleon the Third (I always get them mixed up). But there was no Napoleon the Second. That was supposed to be NapoOne’s son, but he never got to be emperor. The Bonapartist lot decided when eventually NapoOne’s nephew became emperor, that he should be NapoThree, to acknowledge the emperor who never was.
  16. Love the fact about kangeroo metabolism. There's lots of fascinating stuff about the flora and fauna of Australia (and New Zealand) because they were so isolated from the rest of the world for so long and evolved very differently. I reckon animals such as kangaroos have had to be pretty smart in terms of their biology just to have survived over the millennia. Another interesting tidbit: Whitechapel in London is most famous for the Jack the Ripper murders. But like other areas in London, there's the overground national rail network plus the London underground system. What makes Whitechapel very different in modern times is that the underground rail goes over the overground rail.
  17. This is probably the most confusing place to live in: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Baarle-Hertog It's a municipality of Belgium, but most of it is bits within the Netherlands. "Some houses in the town of Baarle-Hertog/Baarle-Nassau are divided between the two countries. At one time, according to Dutch laws restaurants had to close earlier. For some restaurants on the border this simply meant that the customers had to move to a table on the Belgian side."
  18. This is excellent news. Thanks for posting it, Earthnut. I've been thinking for ages whether to get an Audible account, and this might well tip the balance in favour of that. Providing, of course, it's available in the UK, as not all Audible content can be accessed from the UK site.
  19. Examples, should you ever have needed them, of why the English can seem just a little bit odd: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/travel/travel_news/article-4305774/Hilarious-British-situations-caught-camera.html I'm currently watching a UK TV programme called "Coast", which is a collection of all the various things that goes on around the coastline of the British Isles, from people to history to geology. This episode had a segment on a jigsaw puzzle competition, which has been going on for years. The winners are whoever manages to put together the most jigsaw puzzle pieces in the time available. It's not easy to describe, but I'll do my best: The tables are provided by the organisers, and they're placed on the beach between the low and high water marks. The competitors have to decide when to call it quits, as the tide rolls in and threatens to wash the puzzle pieces away. Some seasoned competitors manage to hold up the floating tables while up to their waists in water, using their skills and knowledge to judge whether it's wise to try to fit in another piece before the next wave hits, or risk losing it all. Totally nuts! But quintessentially funny in that British way.
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