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Guest Moriarty

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Guest Moriarty

Hi everyone.

I have a daughter of 8 years old. She is a bright kid, very mature for her age. When I am watching MM she knows that she can't come in the living room. I told her about the show, briefly, and when she does come in the living room and I am watching she always closes her eyes. Now she has seen some movies with some violence in it. Not like Se7en or so but educating movies about the crucification of the Christ etc... Even in the Harry Potter movies there is something creepy and she loves that. Never has any nightmares or so. My question: at what age do you think that I can actually let her see MM. I am aware of the fact that 8 is way too young. Any thoughts?

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My first thought was that probably around the age of 12 or so, but only certain episodes. The trouble with bright children is that they can often understand more than we think they do, and a lot of MM episodes refer to aspects of human depravity that she might pick up whereas another child of the same age just wouldn't even realise is in the episode. I don't think it's the violence as such but the reasons for that violence and a bright child could well pick up on that. Looking through the episode summaries I can see that there are many episodes that would be worrying even for a 12 year old.

However, there are some episodes in season 2 which are somewhat lighter:

Single Blade of Grass has some more fantasy rather than gritty aspects and could lead on to discussions about Native American beliefs. Luminary is just beautiful, except for the corpse that was pulled out of the water, and exemplifies the "not giving up on someone". Somehow Satan can be viewed on just a superficial level, though you might have problems explaining lap dancing, and she'd probably giggle at all the rude words on the parking sign, but the main premise of the episode could make for useful discussions. Omerta is mainly a "pretty" episode (in MM terms) but that does deal with the loss of Jordan's mother which might be upsetting for her.

You obviously have a very good rapport with your daughter. I think it's delightful that she closes her eyes when she comes into the room while you're watching an episode. If she's content to carry on doing that, then I'd suggest taking the lead from her and waiting until she gets a bit more curious about the show. Depending on when that happens you might like to investigate what editing software is out there, so you could edit out some of the more troublesome scenes.

I know we're supposed to shield children from the nastier aspects of life, but many children are aware that life isn't always pretty (bullying in the playground immediately comes to mind) and I think we can do a disservice to children if we try to pretend that life is just wall-to-wall Disney. Since she will in time become aware of the nastier aspects of life, it would be better for her if she has an opportunity to talk about that, and it's better done in the context of a TV show than a news bulletin.

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Guest Frank L.

I agree with Libby. I don't have kids yet, but I know that each child will react differently. Some children are easily scared and have nightmares, while some never get scared and never have nightmares. BUT, there are also kids that don't find violence disturbing when they watch it, especially if there is somebody close to them in the room. When they go to sleep it's possible they get nightmares.

Maybe it's best to talk to her about the show. Explain her a few things. And maybe watch some other shows or movies with less scary stuff in it and slowly let her get used to the more nasty stuff. Like Libby pointed out there are problems with bright children; they tend to have more imagination. But ofcourse it has more advantages, because she'll quickly find out that it is not real. I think as long as kids are really aware of this, things will go much better.

BTW, another nice episode to watch would be Midnight Of The Century. I believe it has one scene with a doll that is a little bit scary, but I think if you skip that part, you can have a great time watching it when it's Christmas with your daughter!

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Guest MillenniumIsBliss
My first thought was that probably around the age of 12 or so, but only certain episodes. The trouble with bright children is that they can often understand more than we think they do, and a lot of MM episodes refer to aspects of human depravity that she might pick up whereas another child of the same age just wouldn't even realise is in the episode. I don't think it's the violence as such but the reasons for that violence and a bright child could well pick up on that. Looking through the episode summaries I can see that there are many episodes that would be worrying even for a 12 year old.

However, there are some episodes in season 2 which are somewhat lighter:

Single Blade of Grass has some more fantasy rather than gritty aspects and could lead on to discussions about Native American beliefs. Luminary is just beautiful, except for the corpse that was pulled out of the water, and exemplifies the "not giving up on someone". Somehow Satan can be viewed on just a superficial level, though you might have problems explaining lap dancing, and she'd probably giggle at all the rude words on the parking sign, but the main premise of the episode could make for useful discussions. Omerta is mainly a "pretty" episode (in MM terms) but that does deal with the loss of Jordan's mother which might be upsetting for her.

You obviously have a very good rapport with your daughter. I think it's delightful that she closes her eyes when she comes into the room while you're watching an episode. If she's content to carry on doing that, then I'd suggest taking the lead from her and waiting until she gets a bit more curious about the show. Depending on when that happens you might like to investigate what editing software is out there, so you could edit out some of the more troublesome scenes.

I know we're supposed to shield children from the nastier aspects of life, but many children are aware that life isn't always pretty (bullying in the playground immediately comes to mind) and I think we can do a disservice to children if we try to pretend that life is just wall-to-wall Disney. Since she will in time become aware of the nastier aspects of life, it would be better for her if she has an opportunity to talk about that, and it's better done in the context of a TV show than a news bulletin.

I agree with most of what Libby has to say here. It is nice to see a parent who is concerned about this kind of thing, because, all too often, I see parents, even parents that I generally regard as "good" parents, letting their children watch all kinds of gore and violence, and that bothers me. I wont even get into what I have seen and heard of some "bad" parents letting their kids watch. For example, a friend I used to e-mail mentioned watching the "Exorcist" as age 8, and I found that disturbing. I guess some parents just leave the remote control and let the kids watch whatever they want.. In most cases, I don't think 13 would be too much of a stretch for MM, but on the other hand, if I had a kid, I would just leave Millennium for him/her to start watching whenever they saw fit. Even with a teenager, I would see no reason to introduce them to subject matter involving murder, evil, serial killers, incest, and the darkest depths of human nature, until more of an adult age, like 17 or 18. I'm not saying it would be wrong to let them watch before this, as I am more of a traditional thinker, but it's something that I would let someone find on their own, as opposed to leading them to. On the other hand, by this age they have probably already been made aware of these kinds of things through other programing, the news, and word of mouth, and are starting to understand them, so maybe allowing them to watch at age 16 or 17 would be OK. I think I was only about 13 or 14 when I started to watch horror flicks like "The Thing", "Friday the 13th" and "Halloween", and I turned out OK, so I doubt that a child would be traumatized at this age, but I can remember really being bothered by some scenes at this age. For example, psycho 2 comes to mind. I remember really being disturbed by the scene where Norman hits his mother over the head with a shovel and kills her. There was just something so realistic about it. Anyways, good luck to you. I don't have any kids, so I am not presented with this problem, but it definitely presents some hard choices and decisions for a parent.

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Hi everyone.

I have a daughter of 8 years old. She is a bright kid, very mature for her age. When I am watching MM she knows that she can't come in the living room. I told her about the show, briefly, and when she does come in the living room and I am watching she always closes her eyes. Now she has seen some movies with some violence in it. Not like Se7en or so but educating movies about the crucification of the Christ etc... Even in the Harry Potter movies there is something creepy and she loves that. Never has any nightmares or so. My question: at what age do you think that I can actually let her see MM. I am aware of the fact that 8 is way too young. Any thoughts?

Moriarty, you are to be congratulated for having such a wonderful daughter, and also for being a concerned parent. Too often, more and more on a daily basis what we see are irresponsible parents giving "free range", with no boundries to kids whose formative years are still ahead of them. "Your mom and i are too tired from work, go outside and play" , or "get out of our hair and go find something to do" seem to be more and more the parenting way these days. Believe me, i am not just saying this, i have relatives who used these as guides for their kids when they were younger and now its coming back to haunt them..BIG TIME.. Good job my friend, diligence is the key..

Your quest for answers i fear is trodden on a slippery slope. What one parent's concern is may not be a high priority for another. We have seen the greatest divisity here at TIWWA when posts have related to sensitive issues, politics, religion, etc. What we have here is an issue that is not arbitrary, it speaks from each individuals history and what boundries and restrictions THEY were allotted or denied..I hope that parents can post their TRUE feelings on this topic sans judgement from others..with that being said, you do bring up a very important issue...

Harry Potter "creepiness" and MillenniuM "creepiness" are two different issues. One is superficial, the other is derived from a much deeper understanding of evil, etc, which for an 8 year old is far too overwhelming. My boys are 11 and 9, and yet still i would not let them watch particular epis, Lamentations, Antipas, etc. Not because of the violence, but because of what is needed to truely understand and comprehend their message. Children dont understand "implied" issues, only those ones represented by a "physical" action..

Remember, though, will all the diligent, sleepless nights that we go thru as adults, the greatest obstacle we have in effective parenting is when the leave the confines of the house for SCHOOL :death::devil: . This is where the true evil lies, and unbeknownst to them, they are exposed to Legion and its minions on a daily basis LOL....What my boys come home with from school sometimes just leaves me aghast. Damage control is also a necessary function of parents. You get a real insight into how others parent when you talk to your child after his or her day at school...

4th Horseman...

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There are some S2 and S3 episodes I'll let my 11-year old watch, but for the most part, the subject matter of the show is too much.

Of course, she was in the room on occasion when the show originally aired, but she was only 1 or 2.

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Being a parent myself i would wait until my son is a teenager like 16/17 to watch MM or the X-Files. He woud watch it with me of course. I remember my brother telling me how his daughter would sneak downstairs on Friday Nights and watch MM with her dad, she was 14. When she was 16 i took her to see28 Days Later, but i asked her dad first. I think its all about parental control and closely watching them on what they see on TV. My son Gabriel is 2 and i already control what he watches and sees. Since i am a huge MM fan something i have done was down load images into my computer scenes from the show. They are now apart of the collage of pictures along with family pics for Gabe to see as a screen saver. When Lance pops up, i tell him thats Frank Black. When Megan pops up i say thats Catherine. THis is how i am introducing him to the show. I would tend to think 8 is way to young to expose her to the show

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Being a parent myself i would wait until my son is a teenager like 16/17 to watch MM or the X-Files. He woud watch it with me of course. I remember my brother telling me how his daughter would sneak downstairs on Friday Nights and watch MM with her dad, she was 14. When she was 16 i took her to see28 Days Later, but i asked her dad first. I think its all about parental control and closely watching them on what they see on TV. My son Gabriel is 2 and i already control what he watches and sees. Since i am a huge MM fan something i have done was down load images into my computer scenes from the show. They are now apart of the collage of pictures along with family pics for Gabe to see as a screen saver. When Lance pops up, i tell him thats Frank Black. When Megan pops up i say thats Catherine. THis is how i am introducing him to the show. I would tend to think 8 is way to young to expose her to the show

I have to agree with Joe, late teens is about the right age. Parents should obviously be the best judge as to what their kids should watch, but I would say that kids are like sponges, they absorb everything around them, and tiny details we adults would consider insignificant can play in the mind. As an example, I was 11 when I first watched Robocop, because my dad knew I could tell the difference between reality and fiction, because it was fantasy violence and nothing like real life. Millennium is quite the opposite, and the nightmarish images, sounds, and adult language (not swearing but descriptions) will leave their mark. If some adult audiences couldn't bear to watch it, imagine what it'll do to a kid.

Generally speaking, the world is a nasty place at times. A kid should be allowed to have their childhood in safety and security before having to become aware of just how nasty it can be, even via the world of Frank Black.

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Speaking of impressionism. I remember at the age of 12 or 13 playing in one of my friends basement. We were rassling around and then under a pile of clothes i saw a Playboy. Being a curious young boy i thumbed through it. In this paticular issue had Sarah Miles in it. Anyone here remember Sarah Miles? Anyway seeing this for the first time was innapropriate for me and i never said a word about it. I soon would ask my mom if i could play over his house alot

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Usualy....I'd say yeah...wait till they're a teenager before getting into the really violent episodes. For one that young, the suggestions I've heard are pretty good. The best being the 2 X Mas episodes.

The important thing is to let HER come to you out of curiosity. If she's not pushing the issue, just chill and enjoy it yourself for a few more years!

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