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Your favourite Millennium episodes


Guest WaveCrest

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Hey, "Goodbye, Charlie" was definitely on mine! I love that episode! There's also the wonderful Lara Means quote:

"I can't imagine [committing suicide], doctor-assisted or otherwise. Life is too interesting, no matter what the problem."

....that is actualy one quote by Ms. Means that,in light of the past 3-years,makes me want to punch the ditzy-broad in the mouth. don't get me wrong,i am NOT pro-suicide but there sure as hell are things in this life that i have no doubt are worse than death. ....i often wonder how the fictional Ms. Means would feel about her comment if she found herself rotting away with cancer in agonizing pain. would she still find life just "too interesting" to contemplate doctor assisted suicide? i guess it's almost impossible for anyone to answer that question unless they are in that situation,god forbid,but that has to be,for me,one of the most idiotic statements to ever come out of that poor girl's mouth. GRRrrrrrrrr :angryred::angry:

....okay i'm fine now,sorry bout that......... :gaba::blush:

( sigh ) se7en :ouro:

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Guest LauraKrycek
....that is actualy one quote by Ms. Means that,in light of the past 3-years,makes me want to punch the ditzy-broad in the mouth.    don't get me wrong,i am NOT pro-suicide but there sure as hell are things in this life that i have no doubt are worse than death.    ....i often wonder how the fictional Ms. Means would feel about her comment if she found herself  rotting away with cancer in agonizing pain.  would she still find life just "too interesting" to contemplate doctor assisted suicide? i guess it's almost impossible for anyone to answer that question unless they are in that situation,god forbid,but that has to be,for me,one of the most idiotic statements to ever come out of that poor girl's mouth. GRRrrrrrrrr :angryred:  :angry:               

                    ....okay i'm fine now,sorry bout that......... :gaba:  :blush:

                                                (  sigh ) se7en  :ouro:

LOL! Well, at least you're honest. But to be totally honest on *my* side of things... that's one thing that's gotten me through some MIGHTY hard times. Last spring, I was really totally miserable about life in general, and I put up quotes (mainly 1013) around my room, and that was one that I had really big on my door, so I'd see it whenever I went out. I had to remind myself. I guess it's just a matter of different people, different POVs\situations.

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One, I would never commit suicide.

Two, I support doctor-assisted suicide because it is our own right to end our own lives (if the person is in pain and is suffering froma disease/cancer that can't be cured) and shouldn't be frowned upon.

Three, people suffering great pain from such diseases and cancers need better pain management drugs (actually a problem touched upon in the novel Pain Management by Andrew Vachss).

Be Seeing You,

David Blackwell

"Don't tug on that, you never know what it might be attached to. "- Buckaroo Banzai

 

"There are no answers- only choices."

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Guest Jordan

I totally agree with se7en that that was a stupid line for Lara to say, given the context. I somehow think that if you were in agonizing pain or faced it in the near future, you'd rather get rid of that pain (probably by any means possible) than wonder who you're next going to meet in this wonderful journey through life.

If you've not got an excruitiating terminal illness and you're not clinically depressed (to the point that you perceive that nothing matters anymore) than yes, the hope that life will get better and there will be interesting experiences could help you through rough patches. Thinking about it, ideas similar to that have helped me through bad patches before.

And that's my two cents. Laura's right I think, it does depend on the situation whether Lara's line makes any sense or not.

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The fact that this is such a hard question to answer is a comment in and of itself on the consistent high quality of this show thoughout its full run. But as to all-time favourites, I'll attempt to restrict myself to 5 from each season, though for Season Two that list will probably have to be longer:

Season One

Pilot

Weeds

The Thin White Line

Lamentation

Powers, Principalities, Thrones and Dominions

Season Two

The Beginning and the End

The Curse Of Frank Black

Jose Chung's Doomsday Defence

Midnight of the Century

Luminary

Owls

Roosters

Anamnesis

Somehow Satan Got Behind Me

The Fourth Horseman

The Time Is Now

Season Three

TEOTWAWKI

Skull and Bones

Borrowed Time

The Sound of Snow

Goodbye to All That

:angel:

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Guest F_Black

I think her quote on that was part of the back and forth of the episode wrt assisted suicide and whether Kiley was "helping" or "hurting". I believe Frank said something to her after that like "I don't think any of us know what we'd do in that situation until we're actually faced with it."

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Guest ModernDayMoriarty

Hello there. Suppose it's best to start out on a new Forum by saying what you like eh? I haven't seen all of Season Three yet, I'm working through them now. Therefore I will have a Top Five for Seasons One and Two and my favourite so far from Season Three.

Season One.

My Favourite Season by far and it's really hard to choose the best episodes. Still, in no particular order...

1) Gehenna.

2) Wide Open.

3) Covenant.

4) Lamentation.

5) Maranatha.

Season Two.

Unlike many here it seems, I didn't really like how Season Two went at all. Morgan and Wong are good writers but for me, they don't do evil very well and didn't in the X-Files either for that matter.

1) Beware Of The Dog.

2) The Curse Of Frank Black.

3) Jose Chung's Doomsday Defence.

4) The Mikado.

5) A Room With No View.

Season Three.

I am actually liking this at the moment despite things I'd heard. It is closer to the feel of Season One and is trying its best to tidy up the devastation that Morgan and Wong left at the end of Season Two.

1) The Innocents.

And I might as well give a list of the ones I didn't like too. This is harder because Millennium really is a great programme. I would include more Season Two than Season Episodes but I'll stick to the Top Five greatest 'Faux Pas' to remain consistent.

Season One.

1) The Well-Worn Lock.

2) Loin Like A Hunting Flame.

3) Force Majeure.

4) Sacrament.

5) Paper Doves.

Season Two.

1) A Single Blade Of Grass.

2) The Hand of Saint Sebastian.

3) Owls/Roosters.

4) Siren.

5) The Fourth Horseman/The Time is Now.

Season Three.

1) ...Thirteen Years Later.

So there we are.

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Hello there. Suppose it's best to start out on a new Forum by saying what you like eh? I haven't seen all of Season Three yet, I'm working through them now. Therefore I will have a Top Five for Seasons One and Two and my favourite so far from Season Three.

Season One.

My Favourite Season by far and it's really hard to choose the best episodes. Still, in no particular order...

1) Gehenna.

2) Wide Open.

3) Covenant.

4) Lamentation.

5) Maranatha.

Season Two.

Unlike many here it seems, I didn't really like how Season Two went at all. Morgan and Wong are good writers but for me, they don't do evil very well and didn't in the X-Files either for that matter.

1) Beware Of The Dog.

2) The Curse Of Frank Black.

3) Jose Chung's Doomsday Defence.

4) The Mikado.

5) A Room With No View.

Season Three.

I am actually liking this at the moment despite things I'd heard. It is closer to the feel of Season One and is trying its best to tidy up the devastation that Morgan and Wong left at the end of Season Two.

1) The Innocents.

And I might as well give a list of the ones I didn't like too. This is harder because Millennium really is a great programme. I would include more Season Two than Season Episodes but I'll stick to the Top Five greatest 'Faux Pas' to remain consistent.

Season One.

1) The Well-Worn Lock.

2) Loin Like A Hunting Flame.

3) Force Majeure.

4) Sacrament.

5) Paper Doves.

Season Two.

1) A Single Blade Of Grass.

2) The Hand of Saint Sebastian.

3) Owls/Roosters.

4) Siren.

5) The Fourth Horseman/The Time is Now.

Season Three.

1) ...Thirteen Years Later.

So there we are.

....Welcome to TIWWA! i more or less feel the same as you do about S2,as everyone here knows,but i do tip my hat in M&W openning up the character of Frank Black. And i did enjoy most of the season until they went bonkers near the end. BTW: after you "endure" the horrid "human essence" it's virtually all "MILLENNIAL-GOODNESS/GREATNESS" straight through to the end of the season. It's nice to see,first hand,more people realizing and seeing the virtues of S3. Hope you enjoy it!

~TAKE CARE,

se7en :ouro:

BTW: just as another example of the many differing tastes,i love almost all the S1 eps you liked the least! LOL!

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Guest ModernDayMoriarty

Well, with Season One it is actually usually more like the episodes I liked least, rather than episodes I truly didn't like. I like most of Season One and 'Dead Letters' in particular could easily have made my Top Five. As to the ones I cited as not liking, I'll explain a bit why I don't like them.

'The Well-Worn Lock' was never going to do well with me as it features Catherine prominently and I dislike her character intensely. More than that though, the episode just isn't vital in the same way the previous episodes were - it just seems like one of those budget 'Cruelty Over Glass: Ann Macquire's True Story' kind of telefilms - the ones that usually star Brian Denehy. It had no twists, it dragged on and didn't say anything that hadn't been said before. It is also sandwiched between two vastly superior episodes studying trauma and emotional loss - 'Blood Reletives' and 'Wide Open'.

'Loin like a Hunting Flame' just doesn't work for me. It had some okay ideas but the casting was rather suspect as none of the characters really make much impact at all. Harriet Harris in particular hardly does anything as Frank's 'Millennium Group contact of the week'. Hrothgar Matthews is hard to take seriously most of the time but I warmed to him. His portrayal of Thomas as a man who is rather burned out and puts up an aggressive wall was quite interesting I will admit. However the other actors (particularly the killer) are uninspiring and the actual sexual/death scenes lack power of any kind. I know there is a limit to what can be done but it just seemed silly - the parts where the bodies are found posed is ridiculous both time it happens.

'Force Majeure' is an episode that, despite some interesting observations on how the world could possibly end, is ultimately bogged down by superflous characters and bizarre plot twists. It sticks out like a sore thumb at this point in Millennium as being something a bit 'out-there' compared to the grinding, bleak episodes that characterised the show thus far. Instead of placing any more angst on Frank, it tells a strange story of X-Files style proportions. If this was aired in Season Two, I would have less problem but it feels badly out of place here. Brad Dourif is criminally under-used and may as well not be in the episode. The real highlight is Terry O Quinn as Peter Watts; he is usually good but shines in this episode. However his statement 'Since I don't believe in Telepathy' jars badly with the information he supposedly has (but I suspect Chris Carter had not envisioned the Millennium Group in the same way as Morgan/Wong did anyway which explains many of the discrepancies between Seasons One and Two's portrayal of certain people and events).

'Sacrament' is probably my least favourite episode of Season One. Tedious and drawn out, it is simply awful. Frank's brother is rather boring and contributes little to the episode. The killer is very dull and illicits no interest or motivation to see what he is doing or why. The last minute change to 'No wait, it's really the father (a character we see twice and who doesn't really say anything) feels like a plot twist for the sake of having a plot twist. The sparring between Frank and Bletcher is alright I suppose but really this episode lacks any real substance. And there is the crime of all crimes for detective programmes - 'We found X, it can only be found in one place so he's our man'. That is the oldest (and poorest) trick in the book and ALWAYS feels forced whenever it is used. Yes, I know it is used in other episodes as well (Gehenna for one), but it just caps off an already flawed episode for me. Maybe if we had seen Frank's brother before, if they had discussed the problem of Frank getting his family and friends in trouble with his work then it might have been going somewhere. As it stands, only 'The Well-worn lock' comes close in citing my least favourite.

'Paper Doves' is poor for many reasons but the main one is that it starts to bring the Polaroid Stalker theme to the unsatisfactory end it would come to. It doesn't seem to track at all when examined. However I realise that these complaints are more properly aimed at 'The Beginning and the End'. As a two-parter it hangs together very badly - didn't Frank think the Polaroid of Catherine and Jordan in Henry's house may possibly have pointed to a connection when his wife goes missing soon after? That connection is not explained at all really and seems a big waste of time. Henry Dion is acceptable as a killer but his mother is an appalling character (or rather the actress was terrible). It was just silly and had no suspense value at all. The episode shouldn't really be criticised for being a poor opener to 'Beginning...' as that is terrible also and is in a different Season written by different people. My hatred of that episode just seeps into this one however (and that's unfair I know but it isn't like this episode is any good anyway really). Mike Atkins (amongst others like Bletcher and Catherine) make it plain in 'Pilot' and 'Gehenna' that Frank joined the Millennium Group when Mike convinced him to get on with his life and try to be of use. This is Frank's rehabilitation from his breakdown about the Polaroid Stalker - therefore he was stalking Frank before the Group even contacted him at all. So how can he be targeting Frank because of the Group? Mike also states that the case is about Frank so why is it so difficult for him to come to that conclusion? The whole 'He can't profile me' thing is silly also - there are plenty of people who don't seem the killing type but then snap, Frank should have seen it plenty of times. This guy is no different, the Group and what it is have caused him to snap so there is a triggering stressor - Peter even tells Frank this but Frank doesn't seem to cotton on that this would be something wise to investigate. I realise this has strayed into Season Two but it really is a terrible end to a good idea and 'Paper Doves' is a terrible Season finale.

Hope that explains some things. Hello everyone (particularly to Raven Wolf, your message was unexpected but appreciated!)

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Guest F_Black

Just watched "Beware of the Dog" yesterday. That's got to be one of my faves as well. I really never understood the bit about then townspeople thinking Frank was "the new sheriff", that just was sort of a dumb aspect of it to me. Too trite and condescending (Oh yeah, simple townspeople longing for a new sheriff. . .NOT).

Nevertheless, I really liked the Randy character, the one who built his house in the forbidden area. I moved to Seattle shortly before the big Seattle boom years (Starbucks, grunge, Sleepless In. . .etc.), so I really appreciated the espresso references Randy made. And he was kind of archetypal of the Seattle yuppie scene at that time, albeit a bit stereotypical (but only just).

The whole business with the Old Man was great, although I would like to read the dialog or listen to it in more detail. It captured the mystery surrounding the Group and really started to get more into the depth of history of it. That aspect of MM really intrigues me. Just the fact that a group of people have a long view of history spanning centuries instead of a few years is fascinating. We're not the end product of history, but we're part of it; all of us, not just the Great Leaders that history books are full of. We're facing the same things humanity has faced for thousands of years just with different gadgets surrounding us. That to me is probably the best insight the show provides, a sense of time depth and our role in history. This comes out more fully in "The Hand of St. Sebastian" which I also love.

And the Old Man's quote "We must respect evil, and we must make evil respect us" is also one of the best from the entire show.

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