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Fourth Horseman/The Time is Now

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Guest soylentblack

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I've never been clear on this issue, is the book fiction and based on the guy who died like "Luminary," or is it the journal, or some third option?

......"INTO THE WILDERNESS" is non-fiction,about this young man's tragic true experiences. for the author,telling this story was like putting together a puzzle of some sort.

~se7en :ouro:

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Guest A Stranger

......"INTO THE WILDERNESS" is non-fiction,about this young man's tragic true experiences. for the author,telling this story was like putting together a puzzle of some sort.

~se7en :ouro:

thanks.

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  • 3 weeks later...
Guest chrisnu

Some additional thoughts on this two-parter:

I've just been rewatching "Gehenna", and Mike Atkins mentioned something very interesting:

"There is a deliberate error in the Great Pyramid of Giza -- an architectural anomaly that some prophets have cited as an error in our calculation of the true calendar year. Some believe it sets the date of the apocalypse in 1998."

I had never noticed this before, and had thought nothing of it when watching "The Fourth Horseman"/"The Time Is Now". This leads to a few theories on how these episodes came about and the aftermath:

1) In the MLM universe, there was a miscalculation of the calendar year, and the Apocalypse came in "The Time Is Now". (Let's forget S3 for the purposes of this discussion. Morgan & Wong had the reference in "Gehenna" in mind and had the episodes planned.

2) Morgan & Wong had the episodes planned, but the plague (as mentioned by The Frenchman in the Pilot) was only a harbinger of what was to come.

Revelation 11:6 - These have power to shut heaven, that it rain not in the days of their prophecy: and have power over waters to turn them to blood, and to smite the earth with all plagues, as often as they will.

3) Morgan & Wong just dedided to end the world (or just devestate it) as a last hurrah before leaving the show.

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Guest A Stranger
3) Morgan & Wong just dedided to end the world (or just devestate it) as a last hurrah before leaving the show.

That one sounds about right. Plauges aren't very original, so it's very strange that it would turn up serperatly on more than one episode. The "plague" from the Pilot was interpreted to be a plague of sin, wasn't it?

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Guest se7en

.......Morgan&wong,in my opinion,chose to end the world as a gigantic screw-you to Fox...............and "others". M&W were openly critical of S1 so i doubt they had Gehenna in mind when they "wrote" those 2-eps. that's just my opinion. Anything's possible i suppose. -(i have a feeling that one day we'll know the whole story on it.)

~se7en :ouro:

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Guest Pencil Machine Operator

I agree, se7en, that it was like a "screw-you" to fox. That's probably why I liked the episode. [i honestly believe that

Rupert Murdoch is Legion incarnate, distributor of all that is foul...but that won't stop me from buying the DVD's! Me and my

double standards,eh?]

Even if you dont like the episodes, i think it's clear that they were completely unlike anything else on the TV (then, now or

ever). To show a once blissful family bleeding to death at the dinner table seems inconceivable, and I don't think M&W would

have written it if they hadn't known it was their last episode. It made clear the fact that M&W wanted to go out on a

magnificent, unique downer.

I think Lara's breakdown sequence suffered from budgetary constraints rather than any artistic deficiencies... a lot of it

unfortunately looked like an art school project, IMO. But ultimately I really liked the scene (and the song), and again, it

was utterly unique.

This is embarrassing but I'll admit that these episodes brought me close to tears a couple of times (please say I'm not the

only one), and by the end I was pretty distraught. The image of Jordan playing with Frank's grey hair, intercut with

ear-peircing white noise was like some kind of TV terrorism, a completely 'downbeat' grenade thrown into FOX's otherwise

banal schedule (so yes, it was a screw-you to FOX, but it was also, I thought, powerful beyond words).

Perhaps it WAS over the top, perhaps it WAS pretentious... but Hell, that never kept Shakespeare from success.

I haven't said half of what I wanted to say, but as I said: powerful beyond words; "my cup runneth over", and all that...

see you,

PMO

[PS. Netscape makes my posts look like experimental poems]

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Guest A Stranger
I'm not ashamed to admit I have cried during episodes of MillenniuM. I'm rather proud and humble to be honest!

I don't remember crying but I do remember coming close and the show has given the me the chills numerous times, which for me when messuring any kind of art is the peak! :bigsmile:

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Guest Pencil Machine Operator

A Stranger:

Are you talking about that tingly feeling at the back of your neck; I get that from loads of MM episodes (especially season2: Midnight of the Century, Curse of Frank Black, Luminary...). Mark Snow's score for Force Majeure always gets me too.

Well, enough of this talk of crying and 'the chills', it's time to, you know, watch some manly sport and drink some manly beer. :grin2:

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