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A realife monster who got just 12yrs


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  • Elders (Admins)

I was struggling to find a forum for this so in the end I went for the general off topic forum. Perhaps we could do with one to discuss real life news and current events? If that's something you would like to see, let us know, but based on past experience we would have to negate politics and religion but it always gets out of hand even when it starts out with the best of intentions. We could have a forum to discuss news events and real life crimes if its something that you would like to see.

Anyway, onto my reason for posting...

Judge blasts 'medieval barbarity' of eyeball gouger

A man who gouged out a woman's eye and threw it from an eighth-floor balcony has been jailed for attempted murder.

Francis Murphy, 26, was convicted at the High Court in Edinburgh of using a metal coat hanger to prise out the eye of 27-year-old Natalie Farrell in May.

Judge John Morris QC told Murphy his crime was almost "medieval" in its barbarity and would make a right-thinking person "recoil in horror".

Murphy, from Dundee, was jailed for 12 years.

Read the full article at BBC News:

https://news.bbc.co.u...ral/8370277.stm

The evil is this mans mind to do something like this in incomprehensible and yet he got a paltry 12 years for his crime, which means he could be out in or around half that for good behaviour.

His victim has a life sentence however.

There is something wrong at the core of the British justice system. The phrase 'an eye for eye' springs to mind, if only for an instant.

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Oh how right you are!

The greatest indication that something is wrong with British justice is the alarming rise of attempts to break into prisons rather than break out of them which tallies with the increasing numbers of offenders who deliberately offend the day of release in order to continue living in the lifestyle to which they've been accustomed. Whether it be the preposterously inadequate sentences that are handed out these days or the pampering they receive whilst in Butlinsjail there is little deterrent out there.

I was staggered to read of a case in which a lady came to the UK to find work and secured gainful employment as a nanny. She promptly killed the child in her care by swinging him round and bashing his head repeatedly against a wall and was sentenced to jail for very little time, if I recall rightly. Upon release she was deported back to her country of origin. In order to ensure that she had a good start when she arrived home the Government promptly gave her £5000 pounds of tax payers money as a bonus along with whatever wages she had accrued in confinement.

Forget the national lottery folks, it would seem there's a less uncertain way of getting a cash payout these days :(

Eth

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I was told one time that if I want justice, don't go to court. I tend to agree with this statement.

Model217, the article is very disturbing, especially this quote from it:

Mr Clarke's allegedly honest intent was irrelevant

An honest intent being irrelevant?

The New York Times had a poll in 1999 and the results were that 47% view legal system as unfair to poor and minorities. Worse yet, they only interviewed 1,000 adults. 39% said there was equitable treatment of minorities and 14% had no opinion. 90% of respondents said affluent people and corporations had an unfair advantage in court.

The news media fared badly in the poll in public confidence, in fact worse than any other institution. 8% of the people had strong confidence in news organizations, while 60% expressed slight or no confidence. The Supreme Court, by contrast, was at the top of the list, with 50% of the people expressing strong confidence in it. Compared with a similar survey conducted in 1978, public confidence in all levels of the judicial system has increased, while confidence in doctors, organized religion, public schools and Congress, as well as the news media, has declined. A majority rejected the statement that ''the courts are just puppets of the political system.''

Most people agreed that ''it would be easy to get a lawyer if I needed one,'' while at the same time expressing the view that ''it costs too much to go to court'' and ''it takes courts too long'' to do their job.

Here's another disturbing case.

The Town of Imperfect

Shannon O’Brien of Tacoma, Washington, has filed a lawsuit against drug store chain Walgreen’s. O’Brien, a 35 year-old with a terminal brain tumor, used the drive-thru pharmacy of her local Walgreen’s to fill her Percocet prescription. According to the complaint, when the pharmacist was unable to get immediate verification from O’Brien’s physician, he assumed the prescription was a fake, called the police and had her arrested on the spot. O’Brien was released on bail the same evening of her arrest and was eventually able to have the felony prescription-fraud charges dropped when her doctor confirmed the prescription’s legitimacy with the county prosecutor’s office. Regarding her ordeal, O’Brien commented, “I was hysterical, crying, very upset and very embarrassed…. They could have checked my records. I’ve had the same medication every month.” Damages being sought have not been specified. Source: The Seattle Times [Posted February 7, 2003]

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"Time is too slow for those who wait; too swift for those who fear;

too long for  those who grieve; too short for those who rejoice.

But for those who love, time is eternity."

(Jane Fellowes)

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  • Elders (Admins)

The ability of the judicial system here to hand down appropriate sentences seems to have been curtailed in recent years, resulting in sentences which are perplexing to many of us. For someone to have launched such a violent and sustained attack on someone, resulting in serious and permanent damage, but only to get 12 years is bewildering. I only hope that the Scottish legal system (as is the case now in the English system) that the prosecutors can appeal the sentence and get it increased.

As for the man who handed in a gun to the police, there does appear to be more about this than has been reported. Most interestingly, is that the defence counsel's appeal to the jury:

Prosecuting, Brian Stalk, explained to the jury that possession of a firearm was a "strict liability" charge – therefore Mr Clarke's allegedly honest intent was irrelevant. Just by having the gun in his possession he was guilty of the charge, and has no defence in law against it, he added.

But despite this, Mr Blackman urged members of the jury to consider how they would respond if they found a gun. He said: "This is a very small case with a very big principle. You could be walking to a railway station on the way to work and find a firearm in a bin in the park. Is it unreasonable to take it to the police station?"

There have been cases where the jury has taken a pragmatic view of cases that should be open-and-shut cases, but in this case the jury took only 20 minutes to reach a verdict of guilty. There have been other cases of guns being handed into the police (in one case, very ineptly handled by the police - providing one can believe the news report - https://www.dailymail...collect-it.html) and no prosecution resulted. So what was different about this case?

Libby

"Humans need fantasy to be human. To be the place where the falling angel meets the rising ape." Terry Pratchett

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  • Elders (Admins)

I was struggling to find a forum for this so in the end I went for the general off topic forum. Perhaps we could do with one to discuss real life news and current events? If that's something you would like to see, let us know, but based on past experience we would have to negate politics and religion but it always gets out of hand even when it starts out with the best of intentions. We could have a forum to discuss news events and real life crimes if its something that you would like to see.

Perhaps we could expand the remit of the "Millennium in the Real World" forum, rather than creating a new one? Given the number of serious topics covered by MM episodes, I think most of the more disturbing real-life cases could have parallels with MM episodes.

Libby

"Humans need fantasy to be human. To be the place where the falling angel meets the rising ape." Terry Pratchett

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Libby, I couldn't agree with you more.

DarleneSignaturePic1.jpg

"Time is too slow for those who wait; too swift for those who fear;

too long for  those who grieve; too short for those who rejoice.

But for those who love, time is eternity."

(Jane Fellowes)

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I can't remember who it was, but someone said about the American justice system "In an American court room you will not get justice, you will only get the law." I've been in law enforcement for almost 14 years now, and I can't agree more. Blow for blow, I'm not sure whose justice system is more flawed, our or Great Britain's, but it would take a very poor justice system indeed to be marked worse than ours in the states. Every once in a while we get it right, but more often than not, someone who should be condemned for life ends up on easy street with no more remorse for their victim than is necessary to sway a parole board.....

"Have I run too far to get home?"

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