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ethsnafu

First birds, now fish.

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Around 100,000 fish have been found dead along a river in the US state of Arkansas, where thousands of blackbirds dropped dead from the sky on New Year's Eve.

The fish - all of the same 'drum' species - littered the banks of a 20-mile stretch of the Arkansas River near Ozark, the Arkansas Game and Fish Commission (AGFC) said.

State wildlife officials are conducting tests to find out what killed them.

Keith Stephens, of the AGFC, said fish kills occur every year, but the magnitude of this one was unusual.

"The fish kill only affected one species of fish," he told CNN.

"If it was from a pollutant, it would have affected all of the fish, not just drum fish."

Meanwhile, officials are also investigating the mystery of up to 5,000 dead blackbirds in the town of Beebe, around 125 miles from where the fish were found.

There were some fireworks shot off at midnight and it is possible that the birds were on their roost and stressed so bad that it could have killed them.

The creatures began falling from the sky late on December 31 and continued into the next day, witnessses said.

"I came out here and saw a bird drop," said resident Stephen Bryant.

"It was horrible, you could not even get down the road without running over hundreds," another resident, Melissa Weatherly, said.

Beebe is a town of about 4,500 people located 30 miles northeast of the state capital, Little Rock.

Residents were not evacuated as a test of air quality found no toxins.

Officials have collected birds from rooftops and the street

Officials are looking at various possibilities as to why the birds dropped dead - including being startled by fireworks, stress or hit by hail or lightning.

Mr Stephens said: "It could be weather-related or possibly stress-related.

"There were some fireworks shot off at midnight and it is possible that the birds were on their roost and stressed so bad that it could have killed them."

High winds and tornadoes struck Arkansas on New Year's Eve, with the hardest hit area more than 150 miles to the west of Beebe.

The birds have been collected from rooftops, trees and yards and are being tested at facilities in Little Rock and Madison, Wisconsin.

Source: http://news.sky.com/skynews/Home/World-News/Dead-Fish-And-Birds-Mystery-Thousands-Of-Fish-And-Blackbirds-Die-In-Arkansas/Article/201101115878597?lpos=World_News_First_Strange_News__Article_Teaser_Region__0&lid=ARTICLE_15878597_Dead_Fish_And_Birds_Mystery%3A_Thousands_Of_Fish_And_Blackbirds_Die_In_Arkansas_

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wonder if that was in the path of the deadly tornado. [death count stood at 7 sunday nite] :ohmy:

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But don't you find it strange that it's just one species of fish Randee? How would a tornado account for that? :confused:

Eth

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Wow, I posted the same article, but I think I forgot to put it in quotes. Oh well, I will return and fix it, or Mark, you can combine them.

I agree, it is strange that it's the same species of both birds and fish. No way a tornado can single out like that. Weird. :confused:

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it is posible that this one species of fish is more sensitive to pressure changes or something associated with an atmosphereic event. or size of them made them more at risk for being pulled out of the river. it is a mystery :suspect:

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It's probably caused by a weather balloon. :whistling:

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Not to throw another conspiracy theory in there, but about halfway between Ozark and Beebe is Russellville and it's nuclear plant. (I used to live in central Arkansas, not far from Beebe.)

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It's probably caused by a weather balloon. :whistling:

:clapping::jumping:

Not to throw another conspiracy theory in there, but about halfway between Ozark and Beebe is Russellville and it's nuclear plant. (I used to live in central Arkansas, not far from Beebe.)

rapid change in water temperature. Ph, or salinity [all posible from a nuclear plant] could also cause a rapid and/or species specific death.

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I sincerely believe that we are going to see more of this happening as long as they are spraying chemicals into the air, they say to control or alter the weather and prevent global warming. Sulphur dioxide, aluminum powder and barium oxide, are being sprayed, all toxic. They are called Chemtrails, which are different then vapor or contrails. Vapor trails come out of the engine and evaporate after a few minutes, and cannot be turned on and off. Chemtrails come out of the plane in other areas, mostly the side, can be turned on and off, and stretch completely across the sky, and they criss-cross them, something else contrails do not do. They spread out and can completely cover the sky. After a day a lot of the chemicals settle to the ground. Here's the link explaining what is going on.

What In The World Are They Spraying

Here's the link to Google images of Chemtrails. They are definitely not vapor or contrails. check them out,.

Google Chemtrail Images

I believe an over-abundance of chemicals in one area is what killed the birds and fish. The public has to become more aware of what is going on while there is still time, before it's too late. We are seeing the beginning stages when we see wildlife die.

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