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Hundreds killed in tsunami after 8.9 Japan quake


Earthnut

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  • Elders (Admins)

This has been a shocking event. Japan is probably the most technologically advanced in dealing with earthquakes and typhoons, but could really do no more about this tsunami than any other country. Although there were a number of smaller earthquakes in that area leading up to this very severe one, it was still very difficult to forecast whether or not there would be a major one or one that would cause a significant tsunami. I haven't yet found an accurate timeline (or it might have been mentioned in one of the very many TV broadcasts/web pages I've looked at) so I'm not sure how much time elapsed between the quake and the tsunami, but I doubt it would have been enough time to warn people in the low-lying areas next to the coast.

What I have found is a very informative scientific website: https://www.iris.edu/seismon/. It's worth looking at, not just for the graphical representation of various earthquakes and seeing how huge the Japan one is in comparison, but also for the options. For instance, clicking on the "last 30 days" gives a very long list of quakes, and "special events" leads to some very informative documents. The website is called IRIS for Incorporated Research Institution for Seismology and is a collaborative project of a large number of US universities.

One thing, though, that has irritated me somewhat, is the idea that this quake might be a sign of the end times, or that it's because the moon is at its closest to the earth. The moon does vary in distance, but the effect is only a slight increase in the tides. There's a considerable difference between a slight increase in high tides (which is water, so much less dense than rock) and a destabilising effect on subduction zones several kilometres below the earth's surface. I even had to have that conversation with my dear husband who I think is still not convinced, despite my explanations and despite the fact that he knows of my life-long interest in science. I guess I'm irritated because all that "woo" stuff detracts from understanding both the practical and the emotional effects on people - not only those who have had direct experience, but all those others who waited to hear from their loved ones and those whose lives stood still while awaiting the arrival of the tsunami.

There is a lot of information that we now get, thanks to TV and the internet, but information isn't the same as comprehension.

Libby

"Humans need fantasy to be human. To be the place where the falling angel meets the rising ape." Terry Pratchett

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Just released 30 minutes ago as I type this, radiation levels surge outside Japan nuclear power plant to 1,000 times their normal levels after the cooling system failed. Here's the link to the full story.

DarleneSignaturePic1.jpg

"Time is too slow for those who wait; too swift for those who fear;

too long for  those who grieve; too short for those who rejoice.

But for those who love, time is eternity."

(Jane Fellowes)

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I am so sad for all those effected in Japan. When I came home from work the videos of the tsunami were all over the TV. I watched as a car was leaving an area that was being flooded at the same time another car was headed in the wrong direction. Just sad.

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We almost had a nuclear disaster at 3 mile island on 28 March 1979 . Let's hope they can contain this soon. Fortunetly most of Illinois' nuke plants are shut down. :ouroborous:

you can pick your friends... you can pick your nose .... but you can NEVER pick your friend's nose !!

MAKE EVERY DAY COUNT!

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  • Elders (Admins)

There are so many images and videos on the internet showing the devastation, but there's one particular video that I've watched several times. It was taken by a man out walking in Chiba, which is about 310 km or nearly 200 miles south from Sendai. The effect of the quake was quite small, but the sudden appearance of moving cracks in the pavement, and water bubbling up from underground, is eerie.

https://www.dump.com/...se-quake-video/

Libby

"Humans need fantasy to be human. To be the place where the falling angel meets the rising ape." Terry Pratchett

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Millions are without food and water. Here's the Yahoo link to an article on how we can help.

https://news.yahoo.co...ami-how-to-help

Here's the link to the Associated Press release from 9 hours ago on how we can help.

https://www.google.com/hostednews/ap/article/ALeqM5hnQ2ysZ8dDAV3IPXbBQNQnXaZLFA?docId=6694265f7abc4ef68fb7ac41f918b99b

DarleneSignaturePic1.jpg

"Time is too slow for those who wait; too swift for those who fear;

too long for  those who grieve; too short for those who rejoice.

But for those who love, time is eternity."

(Jane Fellowes)

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  • Elders (Admins)

On another forum, there are posts from people who live in Japan, and from those who have family and friends there. Those posts, and links to various websites, have made me think:

1. The courage and fortitude of people there in dealing with the devastation. Although they are used to earthquakes, and the term 'tsunami' is a Japanese word, this time it's been worse than previous occasions, even the devastating Kobe earthquake, because the damage is so widespread over a huge swathe of the east coast. It has also affected the supply of electricity because of the shutdown of nuclear reactors, and many of their industrial plants have had to temporarily close and that is already having an effect on their economy. But people are doing what they can. Even in undamaged areas, when daily electricity blackouts were announced, people are voluntarily restricting their use of electricity so that power can be diverted to where it's most needed.

2. The effect on both the local and global economy has yet to be realised. The global stock exchanges are already reflecting a downturn in the value of shares in Japanese industry; but generally Japanese industry is held in high regard, so economic recovery is feasible if manufacturing can be restarted quickly, but that will depend on electricity supplies.

3. There is a lack of understanding about the nuclear reactors that have been affected. I've seen a number of media reports, which generally lack a clear knowledge of not only nuclear reactors in general but also of the particular ones that have had problems. I've read some more scientific websites, but it's difficult to know which ones are accurate. There is a distinct problem in disseminating information to non-scientists. But it's worth reiterating that "nuclear" doesn't always mean "bad"; nor does "radiation" always mean "dangerous". Of particular note: "Bananas are radioactive enough to regularly cause false alarms on radiation sensors used to detect possible illegal smuggling of nuclear material at US ports." See: https://en.wikipedia...equivalent_dose. The people working on the damaged nuclear reactors may well have received more than the permitted exposure in that industry; they may very well go on to live long and healthy lives, but they'll be out of the job.

4. There are rumours of scaremongering. This was an entirely natural event, with entirely natural causes. We live on an active planet – thank goodness, otherwise we wouldn't be alive. Earthquakes happen as a result of tectonic activity; Japan is on the Pacific "Ring of Fire", one area on the planet where there is significant tectonic plate movement. This event was not a punishment from a vengeful deity nor was it engineered by humans.

5. There are rumours of scam artists setting up fake charities in order to cash in. If in doubt, donate to Red Cross. There are other established charities that provide humanitarian and specialist help. Don't allow your heart to override your head; so do a bit a research before you part with any cash. You worked hard for that money, so make sure any money you donate goes to help the victims.

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Libby

"Humans need fantasy to be human. To be the place where the falling angel meets the rising ape." Terry Pratchett

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  • Elders (Admins)

5. There are rumours of scam artists setting up fake charities in order to cash in. If in doubt, donate to Red Cross. There are other established charities that provide humanitarian and specialist help. Don't allow your heart to override your head; so do a bit a research before you part with any cash. You worked hard for that money, so make sure any money you donate goes to help the victims.

Good post Libby, I agree with your perspective and especially the advice about the charitable donations.

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