Jump to content

Replicated Meat – Coming Soon to Major Supermarkets Near You


Recommended Posts

Replicated Meat – Coming Soon to Major Supermarkets Near You

https://www.yahoo.com/tech/innovation-dominates-communication-79965946822.html

There's a video on the page, which is fascinating to watch, if interested of course. They say the synthetic meat is good.

Innovation dominates communication, transportation, and now…tacos. Some heavy hitters of the tech world—Biz Stone (of Twitter) and Bill Gates (of, well, you know)—have invested in Beyond Meat, a startup that wants to revolutionize meat…or meat-like substances.

I sit down at a picnic table surrounded by food trucks to try a taco made with what I would call fake chicken; PR people call it synthetic meat, but Beyond Meat’s founder and CEO Ethan Brown actually calls his product meat—albeit meat constructed in a factory from vegetable “inputs.”
“It’s meat made out of plants,” Brown says. “We have taken the constituent parts of meat proteins and sourced them from the plant kingdom—proteins, water, lipids, trace minerals, carbohydrates—and recreated animal meat.”
Health and environmental benefits
Beyond Meat’s products are all zero saturated fat, zero trans fat, and zero cholesterol. And let’s not forget how much cows contribute to climate change (the methane cows emit is an even more potent greenhouse gas than the CO₂ your car puts out). Brown says, “If you change the three to four ounces of protein you put on your plate at dinner, you can make more of a difference than buying a new Prius or upgrading the heating system in your home. It’s actually one of the most important things you can do to address climate change.”
Yeah, that’s all well and good, but how does it taste?
Taste test #1: “Chicken-Free Strips”
The plant-based chicken substitute is mixed into an onion, pepper, and chili base that I spoon into my crunchy taco shell. Add guac, beans, and salsa, and the taste test commences.
As with all food experiences, appearance and texture matter almost as much as flavor, and Beyond Meat is clearly not your mom’s tofurkey. Instead of the homogeneous, blocky meat substitutes of the past, Beyond Meat’s Chicken-Free Strips have the same sinewy appearance of the real thing. My taco looks like a chicken taco.
First bite: Everything tastes right. Even more importantly, everything feels right, too. In these first few bites, I realize the texture of Beyond Meat chicken is, well, just like chicken. And maybe I shouldn’t be so surprised; 15 years of research has gone into perfecting the process, taking the same “inputs” that meat has—proteins, lipids, water—and running them through a process of heating, cooling, and pressure that realigns and interlinks the proteins so they resemble muscle, or meat.
The taste is good, too. In my well-flavored taco, I get none of the weird plastic taste you sometimes get when you get a big chunk of tofu in a mixed dish. That said, when I try Beyond Meat chicken alone, it tastes pretty good, but not as good as real chicken. On the other hand, how often do you eat chicken with absolutely no other flavoring? Bottom line: I wouldn’t eat it plain, but it’s great mixed in with other flavors and textures. And when I admit this to Brown, he totally gets it: “This is Beyond Meat 2.0. We can’t wait to bring 3.0 and 4.0 to market, and that’s what we’re aiming for—indistinguishable chicken taste.”
Taste test #2: “Beef-Free Crumble”
I taste the beef crumbles in a bowl of chili, and they are even better. The taste is excellent, and the texture is really incredible. It feels and chews just like ground beef or turkey.
Humans have evolved eating meat, and so we naturally associate that texture—along with the flavor—with the sustenance we need. Beyond Meat passes the test in ways that other meat substitutes I’ve tried just can’t match.
Availability
Beyond Meat is available in Whole Foods, Sprouts, and Publix stores—and will be coming to some big chains like Safeway in May and Target in September.

DarleneSignaturePic1.jpg

"Time is too slow for those who wait; too swift for those who fear;

too long for  those who grieve; too short for those who rejoice.

But for those who love, time is eternity."

(Jane Fellowes)

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 8
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

This seems like such a win win... No animals were harmed in the making of this hamburger. :) If this helps world hunger, reduces animal suffering, and conserves energy and resources in the process, wow what a great day. Our instincts go against GMO's (although I think is more of a precessed food than a GMO, though it could be made with GMO's) but the truth is that since man started planting man has been tinkering with the genetic outcome of crops to produce the best an most abundant foods they could. Now we just use the modern tools available to us. In a perfect world maybe we would all be eating a diet of mostly or entirely organic plants, but with the world as it is, 100% organic also means lots of people starving to death... And hunger is already a big enough problem. There has to be a middle road between intensive factory farming and subsistence level farming and if the it is in a laboratory that we find the answer, well, sign me up for a "chicken" taco.

We live in a world where too many people won't go far enough... won't do what they know is right... what they believe. I don't know how or why it got this way but the world has become so complicated, to involve yourself in someone else's problems is to invite them needlessly on yourself. ~ Frank Black

Link to post
Share on other sites

I'll stick to the real deal not only because I enjoy eating meat but untold thousands who make a living in the livestock industry from breeders to Veterinarians to grain and livestock farmers and those who transport livestock and of course those who process meat would lose a way to earn a living and provide for their families.

you can pick your friends... you can pick your nose .... but you can NEVER pick your friend's nose !!

MAKE EVERY DAY COUNT!

Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm with you Walkabout. The only problem is now the quality of the meat we are getting at the store.

DarleneSignaturePic1.jpg

"Time is too slow for those who wait; too swift for those who fear;

too long for  those who grieve; too short for those who rejoice.

But for those who love, time is eternity."

(Jane Fellowes)

Link to post
Share on other sites

Buy it the old way, from a local person who grows them, tends them, and lets them have lives, and does the killing in as humane a method as possible. Mass production is not the way. The closer you are to your food, the more you appreciate it, and I think the more you honor the sacrifice of the animal.

Glad this is about vegetable based meat stuff... if they can do it without GMO, that'd be great.

"I smell blood and an era of prominent madmen"

W. H. Auden
Link to post
Share on other sites

But again, if we were all to revert to the buy it local idea (I love the idea but the practice...) bananas and oranges would not be found in most of our homes. There would be very little beef in the north east. And I live in Las Vegas... Scorpions and ??? for me to eat? I am not saying there is anything wrong with the idea of buying locally, I am just saying that it would require a radical re-engineering of where and how many of us live.

We live in a world where too many people won't go far enough... won't do what they know is right... what they believe. I don't know how or why it got this way but the world has become so complicated, to involve yourself in someone else's problems is to invite them needlessly on yourself. ~ Frank Black

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Elders (Admins)

I think the issue of factory farming needs to be addressed. It's very unnatural and not good for either the animals or the consumers. Animals (cattle, chickens, etc) aren't found in nature confined in such large numbers. That increases the disease risk, so such factory farmed creatures are routinely given prophylactic antibiotics, and are usually given growth hormones to bulk them up. And when they get slaughtered and processed, there are risk there, partly because of sheer quantities, and partly because of bad practices at that stage. An example of that is the outbreak of Creutzfeld-Jacob disease in the UK, believed to be caused by a now-banned processing of cattle carcasses - and it's yet to be known if there are still potential cases in humans.

I understand the marketing of this new product as being fat-free, because that seems to be favourite buzz-word of advertisers. But part of the taste of meat comes from the natural fat. When animal fats were deemed to be "bad", there was a rush to produce meat that was as fat-free as possible. But lean meats, such as venison and turkey (and, apparently, horsemeat) need basting with fats, not just to keep them moist, but to give flavour.

I really don't like the current fad for low-fat processed foods, because often the lack of dairy fat (milk, butter, etc), and therefore taste, is countered by adding a lot of sugar, which is often labelled as fructose, or sucrose, or glucose, which are all sugars but may not be recognised as such. Such foods also often have thickeners added as well, just to mimic the texture of natural foods.

It's got to the stage in the UK where even community paediatric nurses are advising parents of babies and toddlers to give low-fat foods, when growing children need fats in order to grow. Instead of getting the nutrients they need, lots of children are being fed foods with very high levels of sugars. The consequent obesity epidemic is already happening. Not to mention the high levels of salt and compounds such as monosodium glutamate found in processed foods.

I made some tomato soup the other day. It was very tasty, even though I say that myself. Unlike processed tomato soup, what I did was laborious and time-consuming. First, I scored the tomato skins, and immersed them in boiling water. Then I removed them (ouch! hot!) and slipped off the skins - tomato skins taste and smell nasty, reminds me of cat's pee. Then I quartered the tomatoes and removed the seeds. In the meantime, I softened a chopped onion in olive oil. I also scraped all the tomato seeds and liquid into a seive and let that drain. Then I put the softened onions and oil, and the tomato flesh, and drained tomato liquid into a saucepan, and added some lentils that had been simmering throughout all that. And then added some water, herbs, salt, and pepper. The thing is, that it was remarkably tomato-y, and attractively sweet-ish. But that's because tomato flesh is sweet-ish, and softened onions are sweet-ish. The only reason for adding sugar to processed tomato soup is to counteract the unwanted taste from the factory process of mashing up whole tomatoes.

Food is much tastier, and much healthier, if it's wholesomely produced, from beginning to end. But who has the time for that? Most families need two incomes, these days, just to make ends meet. There's not enough time for people to get home from work and then embark on a lengthy cooking process. It's a captive market for the manufacturers and advertisers.

There are quick and tasty and nutritious meals - noodles and stir-fried vegetables and slivers of meat. But there's no way that my husband would find that acceptable. It has to be recognisably slabs of meat, separate and very basic vegetables, and potatoes. The only acceptable "exotic" thing is garlic - freshly pressed over a steak. He's a very English Englishman.

I do wish this venture well. We certainly do need alternative, and safer, sources of protein. But the production is only part of the solution.

Libby

"Humans need fantasy to be human. To be the place where the falling angel meets the rising ape." Terry Pratchett

Link to post
Share on other sites

in the USA some of the 'factory' farms have in fact produced healthier animals than 'natural' methods. Over use of antibiotics and growth enhancers are actually used more with the small producers as they have a tighter profit margin than large operations. This is particularly true in hogs. Pork is safer produced in the closed environment and can now be cooked to a medium temp like beef or lamb.

you can pick your friends... you can pick your nose .... but you can NEVER pick your friend's nose !!

MAKE EVERY DAY COUNT!

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.


×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue. Terms of Use Privacy Policy Guidelines