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7 Germaphobe Habits Everyone Should Follow


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https://www.yahoo.com/health/7-germaphobe-habits-everyone-should-follow-108656692427.html

7 Germaphobe Habits Everyone Should Follow

Korin Miller
January 23, 2015
What some may call “overreacting” could actually just be “practicing good hygiene.” (Photo: CBS)
Between bolting at the first sign of a sniffle to carrying around anti-bacterial wipes like a fashion accessory, it’s easy to understand why germaphobes may have a more “annoying” reputation.
But while they can sometimes take things to the extreme, experts say they have a few habits the rest of us should actually consider. “There are definitely steps you can take to significantly lower your chances of getting sick,” says women’s health expert Jennifer Wider, MD. “Especially this year, where the flu season is exceptionally bad, it’s more important to take these steps.”
No one’s saying you should go overboard with the cleanliness, but by adopting some of these moves, you can increase your odds of staying healthy on the regular:
Hold Your Breath When Someone Sneezes
You’re directly in the line of fire when a friend, coworker, or stranger sneezes in your vicinity. And if that person has a cold, you’re at risk for infection. According to Wider, holding your breath momentarily after someone with a cold sneezes can actually help lower your odds of catching it.
“Every sneeze expels tiny droplets that contain germs that can lead to infection,” she says, and breathing them in is bad news for your health. Just hold your breath for a few seconds to let the droplets settle, and then breathe normally. Since the most common way of catching a cold is by touch, it’s also a good idea to
Wipe Down Your Phone
Many of us share a rather intimate relationship with our smartphones — we touch them on and off all day, and regularly hold them near our faces after placing them on a variety of germy surfaces. Unfortunately, your nose, mouth, and eyes are “the most direct portal for germs to enter your body,” says internist Roshini Raj, MD, author of “What the Yuck?!” She advises cleaning your phone at least once a week with a disinfectant wipe to limit your exposure to unwanted bacteria.
Clean Your Hands After Pumping Gas
It’s probably a good idea to add an additional step to your gas-pumping routine: Clean your hands! According to a recent study from personal hygiene brand Kimberly-Clark Professional, gas pump handles are the filthiest surfaces that people encounter on their way to work. Why? A slew of people touch them during the day, and they rarely get cleaned, allowing for dirt and bacteria to build up over time. Since many gas stations have installed hand sanitizers near the pumps, Wider recommends using them before you touch your car door handle or steering wheel.
Use A Paper Towel On Public Bathroom Handles
Studies have shown that the toilet seat isn’t the germiest surface in a public restroom. According to research from the University of Florida, faucets, soap dispensers, and door handles actually contain the most bacteria. “Just think about how many people aren’t washing their hands, or at least aren’t washing properly, before they grab the handle,” says Raj. She recommends washing your hands, then using a paper towel to turn off the faucet and push open the door, so you don’t re-contaminate your newly clean hands.
Put Down the Toilet Seat Lid Before You Flush
Public restrooms aren’t the only bathrooms that get germy — your bathroom at home can also become a bacteria breeding ground. Something that can help keep bacteria in check: Lower the toilet seat lid before you flush. This prevents water vapors and microorganisms known as “toilet plume” aerosols from shooting into the air and landing on your toothbrush, says Beverly Hills dentist Kyle Stanley, DDS. Inhaling or swallowing those microorganisms, which is easy to do when you brush your teeth, can make you sick.
It’s a good idea to have some kind of cover over your toothbrush in the bathroom anyway, says Stanley, since germs and bacteria can easily snuggle up to the bristles.
Wash Your Hands — The Right Way
You’ve been washing your hands regularly since you were a kid, but odds are you’re not doing it properly. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends that you wash your hands for a full 20 seconds (the amount of time it takes you to hum the “Happy Birthday” song twice), making sure to lather the front and back of your hands, between your fingers, and under your nails for most of the time. This process helps remove surface germs, which can still stick around if you do a quick wash. “Over 80 percent of infectious diseases are transmitted through the hands, so proper hand hygiene is essential,” says Raj.
Clean Your Handbag Often
Your bag goes everywhere with you — restaurants, work, public transportation — and it often sits on desks, tables, and the floor. Once you bring it home, you may put it on your kitchen counter or bed. So … when was the last time you cleaned it? According to Raj, you should periodically wipe the outside of your bag with a sanitizing wipe to get rid of germs lingering on the surface. Planning to wipe your phone while you’re at it? Use a new wipe, or you’ll transfer the germs from one surface to another.

DarleneSignaturePic1.jpg

"Time is too slow for those who wait; too swift for those who fear;

too long for  those who grieve; too short for those who rejoice.

But for those who love, time is eternity."

(Jane Fellowes)

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  • Elders (Admins)

All good tips.

I'm always surprised by how many people now don't cover their mouth and nose when they cough or sneeze. When I was young, that was drummed into us: "Coughs and sneezes spread diseases, trap them in your handkerchief."

There are increasing numbers of us living/working in smaller areas, but we seem to be losing the concept of caring for each other - even by adopting basic hygiene to prevent the passing on of various nasties.

Libby

"Humans need fantasy to be human. To be the place where the falling angel meets the rising ape." Terry Pratchett

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what doesn't kill you makes you stronger ! a strong immune system protects you from more than what you get from common household things.

you can pick your friends... you can pick your nose .... but you can NEVER pick your friend's nose !!

MAKE EVERY DAY COUNT!

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A must see video ~

What Is the Best Way to Sneeze?

DarleneSignaturePic1.jpg

"Time is too slow for those who wait; too swift for those who fear;

too long for  those who grieve; too short for those who rejoice.

But for those who love, time is eternity."

(Jane Fellowes)

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  • Elders (Admins)

what doesn't kill you makes you stronger ! a strong immune system protects you from more than what you get from common household things.

I do think that's true for most people. And a healthy lifestyle (lots of fruit'n'veg and fresh air) helps a lot. And there's increasing views that protecting young children too much from common microbes doesn't always help them develop a healthy immune system.

It's difficult to figure out why some conditions, e.g. asthma, are on the rise. Some ideas are that it's because of an under-exposure to common antigens because of too much cleaning; but there are some ideas that these days homes have lots of carpeting and fabric upholstery, which hold those antigens and therefore there's an over-exposure to antigens. It's probably one of those "Goldilocks" things; but I wish they'd make up their minds. I've always felt guilty about my lack of interest in housework, but maybe I did it just right?

There's a peculiarity about HIV, because of how long it takes for the immune system to finally collapse into AIDS. There's a group of prostitutes in Kenya who tested positive for HIV, but didn't develop AIDS. But a few of them did eventually reduce the frequency of unprotected sexual contacts, and then went on to develop AIDS. One hypothesis is that those women's immune systems kept the HIV virus at bay because of frequent challenges to their immune systems. That seemingly kept their immune systems in tip-top condition; but when the challenge was diminished, their immune systems crumbled.

There's some research into gut flora for people suffering from IBS. The hypothesis is that introducing gut flora from non-IBS people into the gut of IBS sufferers could help prime the IBS system with good bacteria. The good gut flora is actually produced from the poop of non-IBS people, then suitably treated, and formulated into a pill that the IBS person then swallows. That all sounds good; except I don't want to end up with even good gut flora from somebody who hasn't washed their hands post-pooping. And that's a major problem, because there's a difference between normal challenges to immune systems and challenges because of the "couldn't care less about other people" attitude.

Libby

"Humans need fantasy to be human. To be the place where the falling angel meets the rising ape." Terry Pratchett

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