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Words we don't have in English


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  • Elders (Admins)

I used the term "my daughter's father-in-law" in another thread. That's such an awkward phrase, and got me wondering why we don't have an simple term for the relationship between someone and their offspring's partner's parents. After all, until recent times, marriages were mostly matters of business, rather than love.

With all the codifying of law starting way back in medieval times, and especially after the Norman Invasion of Britain in 1066, where there was an intermingling of Old English (which included a lot of Scandinavian) and Old French (which included a lot of Roman law), I would have thought that there should be a term that described the relationship of the (male) heads of households who were joined by matrimony.

I find that puzzling. Especially as I gather that there are languages where there are standard terms that distinguish between a paternal and a maternal grandparent.

Since we're an international group, I thought I throw this conundrum out for comment, because it's obvious that the English language doesn't have all the answers.

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Libby

"Humans need fantasy to be human. To be the place where the falling angel meets the rising ape." Terry Pratchett

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I used the term "my daughter's father-in-law" in another thread. That's such an awkward phrase, and got me wondering why we don't have an simple term for the relationship between someone and their off

I think most non-Welsh people call it "Llanfair-gogogoch", and possibly some Welsh people as well. Welsh is a fascinating language, which nearly became extinct. But has not only been revived, than

BEER----> How about just 'Llanfair' - I can say that? BELCH

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I used the term "my daughter's father-in-law" in another thread. That's such an awkward phrase, and got me wondering why we don't have an simple term for the relationship between someone and their offspring's partner's parents. After all, until recent times, marriages were mostly matters of business, rather than love.

With all the codifying of law starting way back in medieval times, and especially after the Norman Invasion of Britain in 1066, where there was an intermingling of Old English (which included a lot of Scandinavian) and Old French (which included a lot of Roman law), I would have thought that there should be a term that described the relationship of the (male) heads of households who were joined by matrimony.

I find that puzzling. Especially as I gather that there are languages where there are standard terms that distinguish between a paternal and a maternal grandparent.

Since we're an international group, I thought I throw this conundrum out for comment, because it's obvious that the English language doesn't have all the answers.

BEER----> Let's make one up. I'm sure a lot of other words have been 'Made Up'.

BELCH

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I think "next of kin" could be another example, couldnt it?

I mean i really like the sound of it and think its very cool, but you could also have a single, easier word for that. happy.gif

There are a lot of german words, that you use instead of "own" english waords, like "Kindergarten" (translation would be "Childrens' garden") or "Poltergeist" (rumbleghost happy.gif ).

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When I find some time I'd like to research when we started using the word, "Grand." I'm a grandparent; or am I a grand parent?

The Term "in-law" gets to me. There should be an easier way to describe them. So once they are no longer related, do they become "out-law?"

Here's info on "in-law" from ~ http://english.stackexchange.com/questions/29695/wheres-in-law-in-mother-in-law-from

A phrase appended to names of relationship, as father, mother, brother, sister, son, etc., to indicate that the relationship is not by nature, but in the eye of the Canon Law, with reference to the degrees of affinity within which marriage is prohibited. These forms can be traced back to the 14th century. Formerly -in-law was also used to designate those relationships which are now expressed by step-, e.g. son-in-law = step-son, father-in-law = step-father; this, though still locally or vulgarly current, is now generally considered a misuse.

Essentially, you cannot marry anyone related to you "in-law" because Canon Law treats them identically to an actual brother, sister, etc.

On a lighter note, I used to wear thongs on my feet, now they are called flip-flops, and a thong is something that I wear up my derrière.

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"Time is too slow for those who wait; too swift for those who fear;

too long for  those who grieve; too short for those who rejoice.

But for those who love, time is eternity."

(Jane Fellowes)

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  • Elders (Admins)

Right, here we go, found it.

Enjoy, thou gorbellied hedge-born canker-blossom"!

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  • Elders (Admins)

Good old Bill. He single-handedly did more for the English language than generations of invaders/academics.

William: I like that German has the facility to join words together to make a slightly different word. "Poltergeist" is a brilliant example.

Earthnut: That's another puzzle, the difference between "grand" and "great". My father's father is my grandfather, but my father's aunt is my great aunt. Weird.

"Out-law" is a perfect description of former in-laws who you are glad to see the back of. wink.gif

Libby

"Humans need fantasy to be human. To be the place where the falling angel meets the rising ape." Terry Pratchett

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Now here's a word that originated in the U K by two brothers, in a song written by the same name, for the Disney movie Mary Poppins.

"Supercalifragilisticexpialidocious"

From wikipedia ~

Supercalifragilisticexpialidocious

According to Richard M. Sherman, co-writer of the song with his brother, Robert, the word was one that the two knew in their youth. In an episode of the Disney Family Album featuring the story of the brother's careers, Richard Sherman stated, "we remembered this wonderful word from our childhood."
In a 2007 interview, Sherman indicated that the final version of the word was produced by the two brothers over the course of two weeks during the songwriting process, indicating only that the origins of the word were in their memories of creating double-talk words in their childhood.
The roots of the word have been defined as follows: super- "above", cali- "beauty", fragilistic- "delicate", expiali- "to atone", and -docious "educable", with the sum of these parts signifying roughly "Atoning for educability through delicate beauty." According to the film, it is defined as "something to say when you have nothing to say."
Supercalifragilisticexpialidocious was first added to the Oxford English Dictionary in 1986. A well known feghoot indirectly makes reference to this word, by affirming that Mahatma Gandhi was a "super calloused fragile mystic hexed by halitosis."

DarleneSignaturePic1.jpg

"Time is too slow for those who wait; too swift for those who fear;

too long for  those who grieve; too short for those who rejoice.

But for those who love, time is eternity."

(Jane Fellowes)

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  • Elders (Admins)

Hers a famous word we don't have in English...

Llanfair­pwllgwyngyll­gogery­chwyrn­drobwll­llan­tysilio­gogo­goch.

Imagine writing it regularly as part of your address!

http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Llanfairpwllgwyngyll

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BEER----> Is there an abbreviation?

BELCH

EARTH-----> Lord have mercy Mr. Belch, I hope so.

NUT

DarleneSignaturePic1.jpg

"Time is too slow for those who wait; too swift for those who fear;

too long for  those who grieve; too short for those who rejoice.

But for those who love, time is eternity."

(Jane Fellowes)

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