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My trip to Xanten 15/04/09


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In the LVR-Archaeological Park Xanten. On the site of the Roman city of Colonia Ulpia Traiana invites Germany's largest archaeological open air museum for an exciting excursion into history.

Here are a few impressions:

[click to enlarge]

I had a nice day with my family and it´s highly recommended to you- if you travel by times to Germany.
Any questions ? Just ask wink.gif
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post-6893-0-81113500-1377438190_thumb.jp expect the unexpected

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  • Elders (Admins)

That is fascinating, Simon. Although Britain was occupied by the Romans, we don't really have sites like Xanten. Most of what we do have from Roman times are things like mosaic floors or the masonry foundations of walls, which were preserved by the accretion of soil and plants over time.

One of the lecture-courses-on-DVD that I bought recently is called "Understanding Greek and Roman Technology", given by Stephen Ressler, who retired at the rank of brigadier general from the US Army Corps of Engineering. It was amazing to get some insight into how the Greeks and Romans achieved what they did, because to us Westerners in our post-Industrial Revolution world, it's a bit difficult to imagine how they could do all that without huge petrol-driven, GPS-guided machinery.

I think it's important to preserve sites like Xanten; not just for their historical value, but because we need to be reminded of what is achievable by human strength and knowledge.

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Libby

"Humans need fantasy to be human. To be the place where the falling angel meets the rising ape." Terry Pratchett

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That is fascinating, Simon. Although Britain was occupied by the Romans, we don't really have sites like Xanten. Most of what we do have from Roman times are things like mosaic floors or the masonry foundations of walls, which were preserved by the accretion of soil and plants over time.

One of the lecture-courses-on-DVD that I bought recently is called "Understanding Greek and Roman Technology", given by Stephen Ressler, who retired at the rank of brigadier general from the US Army Corps of Engineering. It was amazing to get some insight into how the Greeks and Romans achieved what they did, because to us Westerners in our post-Industrial Revolution world, it's a bit difficult to imagine how they could do all that without huge petrol-driven, GPS-guided machinery.

I think it's important to preserve sites like Xanten; not just for their historical value, but because we need to be reminded of what is achievable by human strength and knowledge.

you're righthappy.gif it´s fascinating and yes-

we have to remind and those rebuild/original buildings help to imagine as it once was and you feel quite back to the time.

Inside the Museum -many objects can be seen from the time like pots, cups, jewelry, armours, lances, scriptures and many more.

Twenty years ago I was for the first time in the Archaeological Park Xanten-and I can say it's added a lot of new buildings and objects-

and the excavations are still far from complete.

post-6893-0-81113500-1377438190_thumb.jp expect the unexpected

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  • Elders (Admins)

Great photos, thanks for sharing!

Funnily enough we have a Roman Bath site right behind my house, behind our garden wall. It's next door to a house that used to be owned by Albert Gubay, the chap who started Kwiksave (Libby will know what I'm talking about!).

It's nothing like the preserved site you posted about, and our beloved and dare I say grossly negligent Cadw and our County Archaeologists let our council get away with granting permission to a building company to build houses all over the site of the old fort/port back in the 1990's (building over a live badger set at the time). All that remains is the bath house, surrounded by some trees, where local children from those homes play, wearing it away further.

Cadw supposedly works to protect the historic environment and heritage sites of Wales, and to enable accessible, understandable and life-enhancing experiences of Welsh history, culture and landscape, but clearly failed to protect this site from the developers, much to the amazement of The English Heritage people and The National Trust.

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Ditto from me, great photos and thank you for sharing. :clapping:

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"Time is too slow for those who wait; too swift for those who fear;

too long for  those who grieve; too short for those who rejoice.

But for those who love, time is eternity."

(Jane Fellowes)

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