Jump to content

Hollywood Salaries Revealed: Who Makes What on the Lot and on Location


Recommended Posts

Had the choice between the TV or Movie forum for this information, and decided Roedecker would pick movies.  It absolutely amazes me how much some of these people have made per TV episode or per movie.

 

Hollywood Salaries Revealed: Who Makes What on the Lot and on Location

 

https://www.yahoo.com/movies/hollywood-salaries-revealed-who-makes-what-on-the-160526500.html

 

The Hollywood Reporter

October 1, 2015

 

This story first appeared in the Oct. 9 issue of The Hollywood Reporter magazine.

 

By Austin Siegemund-Broka, Paul Bond, The Hollywood Reporter

 

“People in this business are always looking at other people and comparing,” says a top Hollywood attorney. “I always have clients calling me and saying, ‘Am I being paid enough? Should I be paid more?’ ”

 

Luckily for all, there’s lots of comparing to do in THR’s second annual What Hollywood Earns report. To research the salaries of everyone from key grips to movie stars, the magazine consulted with executives, producers, payroll service companies, the industry guilds and others who have inside information about how and where the money is flowing in 2015 (including a horse farm in upstate New York that “FedExes” its animal actors to Hollywood shooting locations). This year, thanks to North Korean cybercriminals, there were other sources as well — the thousands of emails and employment contracts that spilled Hollywood salary secrets all over the Internet during last November’s Sony hack.

 

The takeaway? TV producing fees are up (to as much as $75,000 an episode), Meryl Streep gets rich even from flops ($5 million for Ricki and the Flash?), and extras love it when it rains.

 

WHO MAKES WHAT ON THE LOT

 

Studio Tour Guide

Yukking it up with tourists around the lot pays $26 an hour, but only after a training period during which compensation is $20 an hour.

 

Television Actor

Newcomers can expect to earn just $15,000 to $20,000 per episode on a network or cable series. Experienced actors take home as much as $75,000 to $100,000 an episode, and bigger stars can earn $150,000 to topline a series in its first season. Raises (usually about 4 percent) come each subsequent season (James Spader made $160,000 per episode for season two of The Blacklist; Jeff Garlin made $84,000 per episode on season two of The Goldbergs), but the real money comes after contract renegotiations (usually for season 3). In breakout success, the stars of hit shows eventually can earn as much as a cool $1 million an episode (The Big Bang Theory’s Johnny Galecki and Jim Parsons).

 

Film Writer

Established movie scribes can make $1 million a script, plus a bonus if they get final credit. Selling a spec screenplay can range from the low-six figures to $3 million (what Sony paid James Vanderbilt for White House Down) or more. The most lucrative work can come via rewrites or touch-ups, where bankable script doctors can make $500,000 for just a few weeks of effort.

 

Craft Services

Dispensing celery sticks and Twizzlers to the cast and crew earns these workers about $1,200 a week.

 

Television Writer

Staff writers can start at WGA scale — $37,368 for an hourlong script, $25,408 for a half-hour — or earn $7,000 to $15,000 an episode in weekly fees. Seasoned scribes also get episodic producing fees of $20,000 to $30,000, even for episodes they don’t write. Raises come in subsequent seasons.

 

Gaffer

They make $45 an hour and work 10 to 15 weeks per film.

 

Film Producer

On-the-lot overhead deals have been squeezed, but for a studio release, seasoned producers can make $1.5 million to $2 million upfront and often much more in backend (though first-dollar-gross deals are nearly extinct.) Will Smith and James Lassiter’s Overbrook Entertainment made $2 million for producing last year’s Annie.

 

Publicist

A unit publicist hired by a studio earns about $2,750 a week, or $41,000 per film. Personal publicists employed by stars earn much more, with some making $400,000 or more a year.

 

TV Show Creator

They make most of their money in producing fees, with raises in subsequent seasons. Vince Gilligan got $50,000 per episode of Better Call Saul, Jon Bokenkamp earned $37,500 per episode for season two of The Blacklist, and Adam Goldberg got $50,000 per episode for season two of The Goldbergs.

 

Film Actor

A-list stars still can make between $5 million (Meryl Streep’s pay for Ricki and the Flash) and $20 million (what Denzel Washington got upfront for The Equalizer) to much more with backend (Robert Downey Jr. reportedly made $50 million for The Avengers). Supporting actors don’t fare as well (Kevin Kline made $350,000 for his part in Ricki).

 

First AD

First assistant directors get paid about $8,000 a week and generally work 15 to 20 weeks on a major shoot, for a total of $120,000 to $160,000 per film.

 

Script Supervisor

They get paid about $40 an hour and typically work 12 days on an hourlong TV drama, taking home $7,000 an episode.

 

Supporting Actor

Sidekicks, next-door neighbors and other nonstarring TV roles pay in the mid-five figures per episode. Jonathan Banks got $65,000 per episode on Better Call Saul’s first season, and the kids on season two of The Goldbergs earned $20,000 to $25,000 each.

 

Warm-Up Comedian

Those super-pumped comics who keep studio audiences entertained before TV tapings get paid $3,000 to $5,000 a show.

 

Studio Chief

Running a studio pays a base salary of $3 million to $5 million (what Jeff Robinov reportedly got at Warner Bros.), but bonuses can bring the amount to the mid-eight figures.

 

DP

The director of photography makes $10,000 to $20,000 a week on a 15-week shoot. A few, like Roger Deakins, earn much more ($30,000 or more).

 

Film Director

Studio paychecks range from $500,000 (what newcomer J Blakeson got for The 5th Wave) to $3 million (what Sony offered Danny Boyle for Steve Jobs) to much more (Michael Bay reportedly earns $80 million from backend on Transformers movies).

 

Makeup Artist

They earn about $60 an hour and work about 14 weeks per film.

 

TV Cameraman

Lead camera operators make $75 an hour, or about $8,000 for an hourlong drama episode (which takes eight days to shoot; sitcoms are about five days and pay less).

 

TV Director

Directors of hour long dramas make about $42,000 an episode; sitcom directors earn $35,000. But direct a pilot and you’ll get paid for every future episode, even if you never set foot on set again. Joe Carnahan, who directed the pilot for The Blacklist, got a $5,000 check for every episode of the latest season.

 

TV Studio Chief

Sony’s Steve Mosko earned $2.8 million (plus bonuses) as president, with execs that oversee both a studio and a network potentially making more.

 

Head of Distribution

Typical base pay is nearly $1 million (plus bonus). The person with this title at Sony, for instance, makes $885,000.

 

CFO

The top bean counters earn a lot of beans: Sony’s financial chief makes $900,000 a year, not including bonuses.

 

Production Chief

He or she usually earns about $1 million a year, though Michael De Luca was making more than his Sony co-worker with the same title, Hannah Minghella ($1.5 million vs. $900,000).

 

General Counsel

The top attorney at a studio can expect to earn in the high-six figures. Sony’s top lawyer earns a base salary of $800,000 plus bonuses.

 

Head of Marketing

The job usually pays about $1 million a year. Sometimes more if the executive is heavily recruited.

 

… AND ON LOCATION

 

Stunt Horse

They earn up to $1,000 a day ($500 for a “background horse”) but can cost studios much more in transport fees (the farm in upstate New York that provided horses for The Patriot and Winter’s Tale says they’ve even “FedExed” horses to sets).

 

Stunt Person

Most get paid $889 a day, or about $50,000 a film, if they work every day of a 12-week shoot (and don’t break a leg). But they pay for their own insurance.

 

Second Unit Director

The director responsible for shooting stunts and other supplementary footage, usually on location, earns about $20,000 a week.

 

Extras

These unsung actors earn about $150 a day, or $200 if they’re wearing a hairpiece or working in rain or smoke.

 

Wig Maker

The craftsman who gives Bruce Willis and Nicolas Cage full heads of hair gets paid about $1,500 a week.

 

Location Manager

They make about $3,000 a week but work many more weeks than most of the crew and cast — as many as 30 weeks per film.

 

Driver

Piloting a StarWagon pays between $30 and $36 an hour.

 

Prop Master

The person in charge of the fake swords and alien artifacts makes $45 an hour, usually working 20 weeks on a film (including preproduction).

 

Costume Designer

Pay rates range from $3,000 a day up to $12,000 or more, depending on the size of the film and the experience of the designer. Renee Kalfus earned $6,500 a week for Annie, while David Robinson got $4,500 a week for The Equalizer.

Edited by Earthnut
  • Like 1

DarleneSignaturePic1.jpg

"Time is too slow for those who wait; too swift for those who fear;

too long for  those who grieve; too short for those who rejoice.

But for those who love, time is eternity."

(Jane Fellowes)

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 8
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

Had the choice between the TV or Movie forum for this information, and decided Roedecker would pick movies.  It absolutely amazes me how much some of these people have made per TV episode or per movie

BEER---> Doesn't surprise me. Wonder what David & Gillian are making for X? Glad my son is in the business. BTW, there is a rate called "Golden Time' on sets for all when there is a scheduled time commitment. It's 6 times your base pay, not bad huh!

BELCH

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Elders (Admins)

No wonder that Hollywood has to rely so heavily on overseas markets to recoup their costs. Which is why Hollywood is so much into blockbuster movies - amazing explosions/special make-up effects/great CGI transcend the language barriers.

But for a lot of people below the executive or star level, pre-production can often mean long hours, and filming is often hard work, especially in poor weather and dealing with prima donnas. I've always appreciated the behind-the-scenes interviews with people who worked on XF and MM.

Libby

"Humans need fantasy to be human. To be the place where the falling angel meets the rising ape." Terry Pratchett

Link to post
Share on other sites

No wonder that Hollywood has to rely so heavily on overseas markets to recoup their costs. Which is why Hollywood is so much into blockbuster movies - amazing explosions/special make-up effects/great CGI transcend the language barriers.

But for a lot of people below the executive or star level, pre-production can often mean long hours, and filming is often hard work, especially in poor weather and dealing with prima donnas. I've always appreciated the behind-the-scenes interviews with people who worked on XF and MM.

BEER-----> The character actors go thru their agents, etc. The people  behind the scenes are mostly union members receiving substantial compensation (grips, electricians, etc.). Good for all of them. Los Angeles has lost a substantial amount of this work in the past 20 or so years. The political scene got greedy.

BELCH

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

We should really pay teachers more. And firemen, and police, and pretty much everyone.   I do't really get into  the salaries of the  entertainers, nor do I   have any interest in their personal lives, scandals, etc....  I just watch the show, or movie, like it, like the actors work or not, and  look for their other stuff or not.  

I'm glad ther eis a union for the people  that work on them though, especially or the workers you don't see on film.

"I smell blood and an era of prominent madmen"

W. H. Auden
Link to post
Share on other sites

We should really pay teachers more. And firemen, and police, and pretty much everyone.   I do't really get into  the salaries of the  entertainers, nor do I   have any interest in their personal lives, scandals, etc....  I just watch the show, or movie, like it, like the actors work or not, and  look for their other stuff or not.  

I'm glad ther eis a union for the people  that work on them though, especially or the workers you don't see on film.

I'm with you seesthru, the entertainers get paid way too much, and people who put their life on the line, or teach our children, work for peanuts in comparison.

And, I too have no interest in their personal lives.  I have enough family drama in my own, so I don't need theirs.  I do like to look at what they wear, especially the gowns at an award show for example.

Yes, is is a great thing that there is a union, but they still don't get paid enough.  No matter how wonderful an actor is, the people that actually create the movie, behind the scenes, are the ones that work the long hours and have the talent, and should be paid a lot more then they are.  If acting was so hard, then we wouldn't have so many actors.  Think about it.  Percentage wise, very few become mega, super-stars, and all it takes is one movie or TV show.

Edited by Earthnut

DarleneSignaturePic1.jpg

"Time is too slow for those who wait; too swift for those who fear;

too long for  those who grieve; too short for those who rejoice.

But for those who love, time is eternity."

(Jane Fellowes)

Link to post
Share on other sites

Lots of actors barely make the rent.  Only the ' A ' listers make super bucks and all the people they pay out to [long list ]   goes up as well including California and the IRS .  Lot of pro athletes and  actors  are moving their legal residence because California is sucking them dry but that means living elsewhere for part of the year which as other downsides as well. 

you can pick your friends... you can pick your nose .... but you can NEVER pick your friend's nose !!

MAKE EVERY DAY COUNT!

Link to post
Share on other sites

That's true, only the super stars make the big bucks, many actors are starving for a part.

Has anyone else noticed how many celebrities in California are putting their house up for sale, and moving out of the state?

Tom Cruise is moving to Florida because he said he hates living in Los Angeles, and he thinks all the people in Hollywood are fake.  Maybe the ones he's been around, but there are some good people there, and I can say that after being raised in California and even lived in Hollywood working for PBS.  Cruise may be eye candy, but I think he has a screw loose somewhere.

DarleneSignaturePic1.jpg

"Time is too slow for those who wait; too swift for those who fear;

too long for  those who grieve; too short for those who rejoice.

But for those who love, time is eternity."

(Jane Fellowes)

Link to post
Share on other sites

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue. Terms of Use Privacy Policy Guidelines