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22 hours ago, Libby said:

Just looking at those images makes me feel ill. We had a couple of days of 90+F temperatures and 90+ humidity and that was bad enough.

Yeah Libby, it's not so much the heat as it is the humidity.  And then we still have August to get through.

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"Time is too slow for those who wait; too swift for those who fear;

too long for  those who grieve; too short for those who rejoice.

But for those who love, time is eternity."

(Jane Fellowes)

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2 hours ago, beerbelch said:

BEER----> Hot here too in So Cal. A steady 120f at Death Valley. Here at the beach 85f. Ah, but the water is nice. US Open Surfing contest started today in Huntington Beach.

BELCH

Mr. Belch, at least your moisture in the air is from the ocean, and oh how I miss the beach and California weather.  Death Valley is always hot, and as I said to Libby, we still have August.

DarleneSignaturePic1.jpg

"Time is too slow for those who wait; too swift for those who fear;

too long for  those who grieve; too short for those who rejoice.

But for those who love, time is eternity."

(Jane Fellowes)

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  • 3 weeks later...
  • Elders (Admins)

Surprisingly (and thankfully) August so far hasn't been too bad. Temperatures not much above 70F; humidity as low as 60% during the day; lots of sunshine and breezes.

But that's all going to change, apparently. Next Tuesday, there'll be a Spanish Plume. That's hot, humid, horrible weather that'll push up from the Iberian peninsula. The wiki entry is interesting: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spanish_plume. There's reference to the Mexican Plume, which I hadn't heard of before.

However, as the word "changeable" seems to have been invented specifically to describe English weather, on the following day there'll be another weather system that'll push in from the west/Atlantic, shoving the Plume out of the way. Hopefully, we'll get just a day or so of "interesting" weather before it becomes bearable again.

Libby

"Humans need fantasy to be human. To be the place where the falling angel meets the rising ape." Terry Pratchett

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  • Elders (Admins)

Fortunately, I've never experienced a migraine. And I'd very much prefer never to experience one. From what I've read, they are horrendous.

I get a kind of "prickly" headache when the pressure is high. Many people in the UK report getting an unusual kind of headache which presages an impending thunderstorm. I think the weather affects us more than is generally recognised. Maybe the effects are localised, so in some places it's low pressure and in other places it's high pressure that affects people. It's as though we can cope with a certain amount of variability, but when there's an extreme in the weather (of whatever kind) we don't do so well.

Similarly, the full moon isn't supposed to have any effect on people. But many people who work in places like hospitals, prisons, care homes, etc., report heightened levels of behaviour when there's a full moon. I'd guess it's about more light at night, especially in the higher latitudes. I live in a well-lit suburban area - the street light outside our house is on from dusk to dawn. But there have been occasions when we've been on holiday in remote rural areas, and the difference in moonlight through the phases is quite extraordinary. Full moon is really quite spooky.

Libby

"Humans need fantasy to be human. To be the place where the falling angel meets the rising ape." Terry Pratchett

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A severe migraine can literally shut a person down.  Very serious.

If oceans and animal's lives are affected by the moon, why can't it affect us?  I have no doubts that it does.  High heat alone can make people irritable, especially while out driving, working, running errands, and so on.  High and low pressures are always a factor, and let's not forget atmosphere and environment.  Like the difference between city life (faster living) and country (slower living).

DarleneSignaturePic1.jpg

"Time is too slow for those who wait; too swift for those who fear;

too long for  those who grieve; too short for those who rejoice.

But for those who love, time is eternity."

(Jane Fellowes)

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I get the pre-thunderstorm headaches  if the thunderstorm is a large or severe one.

Never knew about high pressure headaches! WOW!

 

And the full moon?  They say it doesn't affect people, but I think it does.  I wonder if the new moon does too?

"I smell blood and an era of prominent madmen"

W. H. Auden
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  • Elders (Admins)

I'd guess that the effect of high/low pressures depends on what we're used to. We don't tend to get very high pressures here, and it's only in the summer that it's associated with thunderstorms. I'd also guess that it depends on how quickly the pressure changes.

Did you know that the standard air pressure at sea-level is 1013 millibars? (Well, actually, it's 1013.25 millibars, but let's not quibble over such a little detail.)

I think that the effects of the phases of the moon are to do with how our eyes work, rather than any gravitational effect. We have rods and cones in our eyes - the cones are in the center of the retina and give us color information; the rods are around the outer retina and give us only black-and-white information. Then there's how the info from the eyes gets processed by the visual cortex, which is at the back of the brain. Since that bit of the brain gets blasted with everything that the retina registers, it has to some filtering. We tend to "notice" the edges of shapes, and also changes in shapes. In low light, it's the rods in our peripheral vision that pick up that info. That's why noticing something moving in our peripheral vision, out the corner of our eyes, can be scary. (OMG, it's a sp*der!). During a full moon, there's a heck of a lot of white light, so there's a heck of a lot going on out there that we can pick out peripherally. So our eyes are darting all over the place, trying to figure out if those changes in shape mean there's a sp*der/sabre-toothed tiger creeping up on us. In times of, say, heightened anxiety, that's not helpful.

Much as I love science, I do think that sometimes scientists get too focused on provable facts, rather than thinking that maybe if they actually figured out how people work they might not reject some of our anecdotal evidence so dismissively. After all, it's not been that long since we've had electric lighting, so our eyes and brains are still operating the way they did in prehistoric times. It's not us that's weird, it's the modern world we live in.

Libby

"Humans need fantasy to be human. To be the place where the falling angel meets the rising ape." Terry Pratchett

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Wow, I feel like I just came out of Science class.  Libby, you're awesome.

I also believe that the gravitational pull changes depending upon the moon's cycle.  Many plants and animals are influenced, and they don't even need to see the moon.  Even though there are lots of studies, and the results are negative, the studies do not include everyone, just a chosen group.  I have no doubts that mankind is effected by the moon.

Here's what Wikipedia has to say about Lunar effect ~

The term lunar effect refers to correlations between specific stages of the roughly 29.5-day lunar cycle and behavior in humans or other living things. In some cases these rhythms may depend on external cues, such as a greater or smaller amount ofmoonlight due to the moon's phases. In other cases, for example the approximately-monthly cycle of menstruation, the correlation in timing may reflect no known lunar influence. Some purported effects cannot simply be explained by variation in light levels.

A considerable number of studies have examined the effect on humans. By the late 1980s, there were at least 40 published studies on the purported lunar-lunacy connection,[1] and at least 20 published studies on the purported lunar-birthrate connection.[2]Several extensive literature reviews and meta-analyses found no correlation between the lunar cycle and human biology or behavior.[1][2][3][4]

A recent study found a statistically significant connection between sleep quantity and quality and lunar phases, even though the subjects could not see the moon or its light.[5] But a subsequent analysis, looking at considerably larger samples, did not find any correlations.[6]

The moon does influence the behavior of several animals, as described below.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lunar_effect

DarleneSignaturePic1.jpg

"Time is too slow for those who wait; too swift for those who fear;

too long for  those who grieve; too short for those who rejoice.

But for those who love, time is eternity."

(Jane Fellowes)

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