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  • Elders (Admins)

Its been really windy here in North Wales! I thought the roof was going to blow off about 4-5am!

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  • Elders (Admins)

There are warnings out for some areas of Wales - rivers running high because of rain.

The weather in Wales seems to be the aftermath of Storm Abigail, which is the first storm to be officially named in a joint project by the UK Met Office and Met Eirann (Met Office of Ireland).

The naming is for "storms with the potential to affect the UK and/or Ireland, to help raise awareness of severe weather". Which does make sense as it's much easier to refer to storms by names, but I wonder if they're expecting a number of storms this winter. Hmmm. :suspect:

(If they follow the normal pattern of naming storms alternately with female and male names, then there won't be a Storm Graham nor a Storm Libby. Which is probably a good thing. :wink_b:)

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Libby

"Humans need fantasy to be human. To be the place where the falling angel meets the rising ape." Terry Pratchett

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Cool with light rains in Oklahoma.

You got me to thinking about my name, Darlene, and if there ever has been a storm named after me.  Well there has been, but was written in a book by Jack Stewart, "Hurricane, A New Millennium thriller,"  Thought it was somewhat ironic that "Millennium" is part of the title.  Since I couldn't copy and paste my section, I decided, what the heck, I'll just type it since it isn't very long.

Quote

After a day riding in the Bermuda High, Tropical Storm Darlene began a curve to the northwest, toward the Caribbean Islands.  The clockwise winds in the high fed the storm, the winds around Darlene's center whipped up to eighty miles an hour ans she because a hurricane.

Hurricane Darlene picked up speed, pushing smaller storms on ahead of her as she drew nearer the islands.  Darlene was four hundred miles across and reached upwards over fifty thousand feet through the troposphere and into the stratosphere, moving more than a million cubic feet of atmosphere every second, whipping up sixty foot waves in the ocean below.

:295:  Sounds like I'm "bad to the bone."

Quote

Retired Hurricane Names Alphabetically

Agnes (1972)
Alicia (1983)
Allen (1980)
Allison (2001)
Andrew (1992)
Anita (1977)
Audrey (1957)
Betsy (1965)
Beulah (1967)
Bob (1991)
Camille (1969)
Carla (1961)
Carmen (1974)
Carol (1954)
Celia (1970)
Cesar (1996)
Charley (2004)
Cleo (1964)
Connie (1955)
David (1979)
Dean (2007)
Dennis (2005)
Diana (1990)
Diane (1955)
Donna (1960)
Dora (1964)
Edna (1968)
Elena (1985)
Eloise (1975)
Fabian (2003)
Felix (2007)
Fifi (1974)
Flora (1963)
Floyd (1999)
Fran (1996)
Frances (2004)
Frederic (1979)
Georges (1998)
Gilbert (1988)
Gloria (1985)
Gustav (2008)
Hattie (1961)
Hazel (1954)
Hilda (1964)
Hortense (1996)
Hugo (1989)
Igor (2010)
Ike (2008)
Inez (1966)
Ingrid (2013)
Ione (1955)
Irene (2011)
Iris (2001)
Isabel (2003)
Isidore (2002)
Ivan (2004)
Janet (1955)
Jeanne (2004)
Joan (1988)
Juan (2003)
Katrina (2005)
Keith (2000)
Klaus (1990)
Lenny (1999)
Lili (2002)
Luis (1995)
Marilyn (1995)
Michelle (2001)
Mitch (1998)
Noel (2007)
Opal (1995)
Paloma (2008)
Rita (2005)
Roxanne (1995)
Sandy (2012)
Stan (2005)
Tomas (2010)
Wilma (2005)

 

DarleneSignaturePic1.jpg

"Time is too slow for those who wait; too swift for those who fear;

too long for  those who grieve; too short for those who rejoice.

But for those who love, time is eternity."

(Jane Fellowes)

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  • Elders (Admins)

Well, you can be a force to be reckoned with! But I guess a fictional hurricane is preferable.

It's interesting to see that list of retired names. I recognise a lot of them.

Our next named storm, Storm Barney, is waiting in the wings. Forecast for tomorrow is:

West to southwesterly gales and locally severe gales are likely to sweep eastwards across parts of Wales, southern, central and eastern England later on Tuesday. Gusts could reach 60-70 mph inland and possibly 80 mph along exposed coasts, particularly Wales and through the Bristol Channel.

I'll be staying indoors tomorrow anyway, as I'm awaiting a delivery, but I do feel sorry for people who have to walk or drive in bad weather.

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Libby

"Humans need fantasy to be human. To be the place where the falling angel meets the rising ape." Terry Pratchett

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  • Elders (Admins)

Interesting how the UK's Met Office decided to allocate names to storms in the UK to increase public awareness. I know they're nothing like the destructive storms and hurricanes in the US, but you definitely see it's working. 

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  • Elders (Admins)

I think it's good to see the collaboration between the UK and Ireland Met Offices. It's always seemed to me to be a bit silly that the Met Office forecasts (and, thus, the BBC forecasts) only refer to the top bit of the big island next to us, because weather doesn't pay any heed to political boundaries. And most of the winter storms come barrelling in from the Atlantic, so usually hit the RoI first.

Naming the storms does make a lot of sense generally. Depending on where the jet stream is, there can be a rapid sequence of storms, so it's helpful to give a better clue of when the next storm is due to arrive by giving them names.

I wonder what thought has gone into compiling the list of names. My first thought on Barney was: a purple dinosaur? :fool:

Libby

"Humans need fantasy to be human. To be the place where the falling angel meets the rising ape." Terry Pratchett

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According the Wikipedia, there was a Cyclone Graham in Australia in early 2003.

Looks like the names Stephanie and Libby have been used or retired.

I read that the list rotates every 6 years.

DarleneSignaturePic1.jpg

"Time is too slow for those who wait; too swift for those who fear;

too long for  those who grieve; too short for those who rejoice.

But for those who love, time is eternity."

(Jane Fellowes)

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  • Elders (Admins)

Someone on another forum made the point that Abigail could be "a big gale", and Barney is slang for "a rowdy/noisy argument". I wonder if the Met people are trying to be creative with the names?

No idea when the next storm will arrive. Currently, the forecast for next week is for much colder weather.

Libby

"Humans need fantasy to be human. To be the place where the falling angel meets the rising ape." Terry Pratchett

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Yeah, Fall has arrived, and I'm loving it.

DarleneSignaturePic1.jpg

"Time is too slow for those who wait; too swift for those who fear;

too long for  those who grieve; too short for those who rejoice.

But for those who love, time is eternity."

(Jane Fellowes)

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