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‘The Vanishing Women’: Does a Small Ohio Town Have a Serial Killer on the Loose?

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‘The Vanishing Women’: Does a Small Ohio Town Have a Serial

Killer on the Loose?

July 16, 2016

 

 
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If Steven Avery’s story is best summed up as Making a Murderer, Investigation Discovery’s true crime documentary series about a group of six Chillicothe, Ohio women who went missing across a year-long time period might best be titled Making Victims.

The series, actually titled The Vanishing Women, is a six-part documentary that premiered in June, and details the stories of the troubled women whose disappearances from the 20,000 population Southern Ohio town began in 2014.

The women had some unfortunate things in common — drug issues, past or present, for all — as well as histories that, for some, included physical and sexual abuse, and prostitution. Some of the women knew each other, too, and among the many theories posited in the series is that their common problems might have led to common acquaintances who could be involved in their disappearances. The possibility of a serial killer is also a theory batted around during local authorities’ investigations of the cases, though a very recent development — the July 15 conviction of a man accused of murdering one of the women — may mean that theory is less likely true.

Another universal, and the most compelling, feature of the series: the honest, but respectful portrayals of the women, two of whom are still missing. The victims’ families speak to producers about their lives, and no sugarcoating is involved as they detail their troubled pasts. But while putting the victim on trial is too often associated with cases like these, the producers allow the families to try to paint full, if complicated, portraits of their loved ones.

Single mother of two Tiffany Sayre had some painful, abuse-filled years in her early childhood, her father, aunt, and grandmother recall in The Vanishing Women; that turned around when her mother signed over custody to her father. But when Tiffany began to look older than she was as a teen, older men started to notice, and childhood issues she hadn’t dealt with begat years of unhappiness and struggle that included drugs and prostitution.

Sayre, 26, had met and begun dating a military veteran who was trying to help her get her life back on track, and her drug issues under control via rehab, but her family says he died unexpectedly from complications from an injury he sustained while on active duty, and his death sent Sayre on a downward spiral.

She was reported missing on May 11, 2015, and her body was found a little more than a month later in a drainage culvert 30 miles outside of Chillicothe.

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The rest of the story: The Other Victims   

https://www.yahoo.com/tv/the-vanishing-women-does-a-1473105682546742.html

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One man is on trial for one

of the murders, and a woman under attack shot another  serial killer suspect.  

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Man Convicted of Murder in Case Linked to The Vanishing Women String of Ohio Deaths and Disappearances

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An Ohio man was found guilty of murder for fatally shooting a woman and dumping her body, one of several deaths or disappearances of women that have troubled a southern Ohio town, PEOPLE confirms. 

Jason McCrary, 38, was found guilty in the May 2015 shooting death of Timberly Claytor by a jury after three hours of deliberation on Friday. He had pleaded not guilty to the charges. 

According to the Associated Press, prosecutors alleged McCrary shot Claytor, a 38-year-old mother of five, three times in the head and left her body next to an abandoned building. 

A friend of Claytor's, Jessica Lowry, testified that the shooting occurred after a night of partying, reports The Columbus Dispatch. 

According to the Chillicothe Gazette, prosecutors said McCrary picked up Claytor at a gas station and asked her if she would be interested in having sex for money. They agreed but later got into an argument when McCrary accused Claytor of smoking the last of their supply of crack cocaine, after which McCrary shot her, Lowry testified.

The jury rejected McCrary's story that another man, Ernest Moore, fired the shots from the back seat of the car that McCrary was driving when Claytor was killed. 

Claytor's death is one of several cases in Chillicothe that have gained national attention. Six women have been killed or reported missing since May of 2014, a disproportionate figure for the town of less than 25,000, which is located about 45 miles outside Columbus. The series of tragedies was the subject of Investigation Discovery's docu-series, The Vanishing Women. 

It is believed at least three of the missing or dead women from knew each other "in passing" and ran in the same social circles where drug abuse was prevalent, police previously told PEOPLE. 

McCrary was already serving three years in prison for failure to register a new address. He now faces life in prison. 

His sentencing is scheduled for August 12.

https://www.yahoo.com/news/man-convicted-murder-case-linked-163227905.html

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got through the anniversary of the Aurora , CO theater mass shooting that took my youngest nephew , 11 others and maimed 70 others . many of the first responders are still dealing with PTSD as are many who were just there that night .  sick crazy people are out there and I feel for those families who lost love ones . 

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15 hours ago, Walkabout said:

got through the anniversary of the Aurora , CO theater mass shooting that took my youngest nephew , 11 others and maimed 70 others . many of the first responders are still dealing with PTSD as are many who were just there that night .  sick crazy people are out there and I feel for those families who lost love ones . 

As Walkabout knows, we share the same date of death, her nephew in CO, and my oldest son, Robert, but in 2008, and support each other during this painful time.  Hard to believe it's been 8 years for me and 4 for her.  Thank you Sis Angel Randee.

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I hadn't realised that you both share such a painful anniversary. It's good, though, that you have each other at this time.

I'm very fortunate that I haven't (yet) experienced the loss of a young member of the family, but I know others who have. They do "get on with their lives" but only because they have to. However, they don't "move on", a phrase that makes me feel uncomfortable, because that person is still part of their lives, and always will be.

My heart goes out to both of you.

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I"m glad you two have eachother, but so sorry you have to endure such losses.  I lost a great niece a couple of years ago from cancer.  She was 5.  BUt I didn't know her, never got to meet her.  Still, it was a punch in the gut, such a sweet child taken away,  her younger brother wondering why, her parents having to try and cope.   Death is that part of life I will never understand.  

 

On  the killer in the picture.  OMERTA tattoo. First time I ever heard that word was on MIllennium. Had to look it up to know what it meant. This scumbucket, no honor.

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Lisa, first I am sorry about your loss, and know that it's not just Randee and Darlene, we have each other here at the forums.  I try to be here every day to show how much I love and appreciate the others here, some I have know for years.  We have a family here, not just a forum, and you are part of that family.

Death is not the end, it's a new beginning into the spirit realm, that is more beautiful then we here on the Earth plane can possibly imagine.  It's being surrounded by pure love, no pain, just spiritual bliss.  I've had a glimpse into it, and if it had lasted longer then a second, I would have stayed and no longer would be here.  It was powerful, the most intense love I have ever felt, drawing me in.  God is real, and divine love goes way beyond any and all of human comprehension.  I know of no other way to explain it.  It's not a feeling, it's an experience.  My prayer is that the parents have this experience.  Then they will find some peace, but until they are reunited with her, there will always be an emptiness inside.  We have to learn to live with that emptiness, and it does take time.

Regarding the main subject here, "Omerta" is the mafia code of silence and honor.  Surely he knew the meaning when he had the tattoo put on his neck, which obviously tells us something about his character.

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I know if we live long enough we lose loved ones, or we die.  But I don't like the process of dying.    The suffering part.  

 

yeah I learned what the word "Omerta" meant.  I was just thinking, the life form in the picture, is  a monster.   He's not mafia.   NOt that they are so great mind you, but this   person, though he MIGHT be gangster, isn't  mafia. He is however, prime candidate for serial killer. 

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Suffering is not part of God's plan.  The adversary is the god of this world.  I won't mention the name or title to give any recognition.

To me there's good and bad people everywhere, even in the mafia.  They are very family oriented, and what makes them so bad is their business practices, but they only go after their enemies.  They do have their standards, I can say that much for them.

Serial killers, on the other hand, have no honor, just self gratification for whatever reason.  I sometimes think that the way to tell the difference between them is their intentions.

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