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"Time is too slow for those who wait; too swift for those who fear;

too long for  those who grieve; too short for those who rejoice.

But for those who love, time is eternity."

(Jane Fellowes)

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  • 3 weeks later...

Most of the information I get on shows are from Wikipedia.  Often IMDb is incorrect.

Season 2 of Mindhunter aired all on one day, August 16, on Netflix.  The show is so good.  Most of it is about profiling and little to no violence.  Of course I have only watch the first 2 episodes, and so looking forward to the next one.

Here's S2 trailer ~

 

 

 

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"Time is too slow for those who wait; too swift for those who fear;

too long for  those who grieve; too short for those who rejoice.

But for those who love, time is eternity."

(Jane Fellowes)

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The True Stories Behind the Serial Killers of Mindhunter Season 2
Time  ~  Cady Lang
August 20, 2019

https://www.yahoo.com/news/true-stories-behind-serial-killers-003948958.html

It’s been nearly two years since Mindhunter viewers last saw special agents Holden Ford (Jonathan Groff) and Bill Tench (Holt McCallany) and psychologist Dr. Wendy Carr (Anna Torv), the leaders of the FBI’s early Behavioral Science Unit who broke new ground searching for serial killers by using criminal psychology and profiling. With the mid-August drop of Mindhunter season 2, the show picks up right where it left off: The trio is still hunting for serial killers, and they’re still doing their best to convince the bureau that interviewing known mass murderers could be an integral way to catch those still on the loose.

The David Fincher-directed Netflix series is loosely based on John E. Douglas’ autobiographical book of the same name, with Ford modeled after Douglas, who was known as the FBI’s “serial killer whisperer.” And like Ford, the killers he searches for are based on real-life criminals. While season 1 focused primarily on the connection between Ford and Ed Kemper (also known as “the co-ed killer”), season 2, with its primary focus on the Atlanta Child Murders, features some of the most notorious serial killers in American history, including Charles Manson, Son of Sam, Wayne Williams, William “Junior” Pierce and the BTK Strangler, Dennis Rader.

Here’s a look at the real-life stories behind the serial killers from Mindhunter season 2.

 

William “Junior” Pierce

 

Image result for Mindhunter

 

Pierce was responsible for nine murders that happened in Georgia and South Carolina in the span of just one year. Before he committed murder, he had been serving a 10-20 year sentence for a rap sheet that included arson, burglary, receiving stolen property and an attempted prison break. Despite a report from the prison’s psychologists saying he “may be dangerous to himself and others,” Pierce was released on parole in 1970 after serving only seven years of his sentence. It was during his parole that he committed these murders, which included the killing of Margaret “Peg” Cuttino, the 13-year-old daughter of South Carolina senator James Cuttino.

Pierce was arrested in March of 1971; he’s currently serving a maximum life sentence in Georgia.

 

Wayne Williams

 

Image result for wayne williams home atlanta

 

While Wayne Williams was never charged with or even tried for the Atlanta Child Murders, his name is the one most connected with the child kidnapping and murders (22 black children and six young black men) that took place in that city between 1979 and 1981. Williams, a freelance photographer and music promoter, became a suspect for the murders in May 1981 after police heard a splash in the early morning hours by a bridge he was driving over. Later, the corpses of two men (Nathaniel Cater and Jimmy Ray Payne) were discovered in Chattahoochee River, where some of the dead children’s bodies were also found, with fibers and dog hair that were a match for those in Williams’ parents’ home.

Williams was arrested for the murders of Cater and Payne and, as a result, became the primary suspect in the Atlanta Child Murders. During his trial for Cater and Payne’s murders, prosecutors tried to connect Williams to 10 of child victims, but he was only convicted of the murders of Cater and Payne. According to the New York Times, Williams maintains his complete innocence for all crimes suspected and convicted; he is currently serving two life sentences in Telfair State Prison in Georgia for the Cater and Payne murders.

Williams’ alleged connection to the Atlanta Child Murders, however, is controversial — and for many of the victims’ families, troubling. All of the victims were black, and many suspected that the murders were committed at the hands of the KKK; Williams’ arrest seemed to make for a convenient cover-up, some alleged. Special Agent Douglas, however, felt that this wasn’t true, as a white killer would have been more conspicuous in the black communities that the children came from, and because serial killers generally kill within their own race.

Many of the victims’ families also felt that linking some of the murders to Williams was a way for the authorities to close the cases without finding real answers, leaving many open questions — especially considering the speed with which the cases were closed without charging a murderer. In March 2019, Atlanta mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms and Atlanta Police Chief Erika Shields announced they would be re-testing evidence from the Atlanta Child Murders in order to bring closure to the victims’ families.

 

Charles Manson

 

Image result for manson family charles manson

 

Perhaps one of the most notorious criminals of all time, Charles Manson was convicted in 1971 of first-degree murder and conspiracy to commit murder for seven people, the most notable victim being movie star Sharon Tate, despite not having actually killed anyone himself — having instead charged members of his cult following (known as the Manson family) to carry out the murderous acts.

The Manson Family was responsible for the murder of Gary Hinman in July of 1969; in August of the same year, they murdered Tate, who was eight and half months pregnant, at her home on Cielo drive, as well as three friends who were in the house: hairstylist Jay Sebring, screenwriter Wojciech Frykowski, and Folger coffee heiress Abigail Folger. The following day, they murdered a couple, Leno and Rosemary LaBianca. Manson and his followers were arrested in October 1969 and found guilty in January 1971.

Before Manson was convicted of these crimes, he had already had plenty of run-ins with the law for petty crime as a drifter and musician (he notably spent a summer with the Beach Boys’ Dennis Wilson). His rise to infamy was aided by bizarre elements of his persona, unconventional lifestyle and large following, which was made up of mostly young women. Indeed, Manson’s macabre pull took on a different kind of notoriety with the high-profile murders of Tate and her friends, which as Joan Didion noted in The White Album were highly symbolic as the end of the optimism and the shifting culture of the late 1960s.

While the motive for the murders was never truly confirmed, the most popular theory is Manson Prosecutor Vincent Bugliosi’s “Helter Skelter” theory, which posits that Manson heard coded lyrics on the track “Helter Skelter” on the Beatles’ White album that he believed foretold a race war, which he hoped would be set into motion with the nine murders he planned. Manson and his followers were given the death penalty, which became life sentences after California invalidated the death penalty statue in 1972. Manson died at 83 in 2017.

Son of Sam, David Berkowitz

 

Image result for david berkowitz son of sam

 

As “Son of Sam,” postal worker David Berkowitz terrorized New York City for a year between 1976 and 1977 with eight shooting attacks that killed six people and left seven wounded. Berkowitz was the adopted son of a couple in the Bronx. Following the death of his adoptive mother, he learned from his birth mother that his father hadn’t wanted him. This new information sent him into a spiral of arson, during which he set hundreds of fires in the city but evaded capture, later admitting to starting the fires when he was arrested for his murders. In actions he later claimed were ordered by demons, Berkowitz stabbed a woman, Michelle Forman, in December of 1975, before committing his first shooting in July of 1976.

Berkowitz’s crimes followed certain patterns: He usually targeted couples sitting in parked cars and was also noted for selecting young female victims with long, dark and wavy hair (as a result, wig sales in the city rose during this time). He became infamous for using a .44 caliber Bulldog revolver that a friend from his army days serving in South Korea bought for him. This led to his being dubbed the “.44 caliber killer” by the press, but a new nickname, “Son of Sam,” emerged after Berkowitz wrote a rambling letter that he left by the bodies of victims Alexander Esau and Valentina Suriani in April 1977.

In the letter, Berkowitz claimed be the son of a man named Sam, an apparent reference to Sam Carr, his next-door neighbor. Berkowitz believed that Carr and his black Labrador dog, Harvey, were demons. He claimed the demon possessing Harvey told him to kill, leading Berkowitz to attempt to kill the dog, although Harvey ultimately survived. After parts of the letter were published by the media, Berkowitz became widely known as Son of Sam. Berkowitz was noted for seemingly taunting police and courting the press, who reported on his killings with sensational fervor; he even went so far as to send a letter to a New York Daily News reporter. In August 1977, Berkowitz was caught en route to another killing after a parking ticket helped lead police to him; upon his arrest, he admitted to being Son of Sam. When Berkowitz went on trial in May 1978, he withdrew an insanity defense and pleaded guilty to all six murders. He was given six 25-years-to-life sentences, the maximum penalty at the time. He is currently being held at Sullivan Correctional Facility, where he’s been imprisoned since 1987.

 

The BTK Strangler, Dennis Rader

 

Image result for dennis rader

 

Dennis Rader, better known the world as the serial killer “BTK,” “BTK Killer” or “the BTK Strangler,” flew under the radar for four decades under the guise of a devoted husband and father, despite the 10 grisly murders he committed in Wichita, Kansas, between 1974 and 1991.

Rader committed his first murders in 1974, killing the members of the Otero family: a father, mother and their two children. He wrote about the murders in detail in a letter that he placed in a book at the Wichita Library that same year, which was later published. It was this letter in which he first suggested his nickname, “BTK,” an abbreviation (and later symbol) for “bind, torture, kill.” He would use this moniker to sign the many baiting letters he sent to police and the media as he committed more murders. During this time, Rader was bold in his communication with the authorities and the media, going so far as to call police to report the murders, sending the media letters. Rader was known for strangling his victims and was motivated by sexual sadism. He was also known for taking “souvenirs” from the scenes of the murder — often women’s underwear, which he had a fetish for and wore after stealing it from his victims.

Rader was widely unsuspected as the criminal behind the mass murders. He presented himself as a wholesome family man with a wife and two children, a leader in his church and the local boy scouts. He was even an ADT serviceman from 1974 to 1988, providing and tending to security systems that were set up because of customers’ fears of the BTK killer. While Rader stopped committing murders after 1991, his desire for recognition, long seen in his letters, led to his capture in 2005, when he began writing letters as the BTK Killer again. Rader pleaded guilty to all 10 murders in June 2005 and was sentenced to 10 life sentences. He is currently in the El Dorado Correctional Facility in Kansas.

DarleneSignaturePic1.jpg

"Time is too slow for those who wait; too swift for those who fear;

too long for  those who grieve; too short for those who rejoice.

But for those who love, time is eternity."

(Jane Fellowes)

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I did read where what Bill's son did was not a true story, so they just wrote that side story in.  Creepy story.

Sure hope season 3 doesn't take 2 years to air.

DarleneSignaturePic1.jpg

"Time is too slow for those who wait; too swift for those who fear;

too long for  those who grieve; too short for those who rejoice.

But for those who love, time is eternity."

(Jane Fellowes)

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Share on other sites

Wow, thanks Seesthru for the link.  It seems like there has never been any kind of killing that didn't happen somewhere.  So much evil in the world.

Here's the article ~

 

Quote

 

San Francisco's 1971 Crucifixion Murder

When a 6-year-old boy nearly beat to death a neighbor's infant in the spring of 1996 in a neighborhood near San Francisco, it was a jolting flashback for many who recalled a crime in the Bay Area 26 years earlier.

The "crucifixion murder"
Spring, 1971. The camera shutter clicks on an innocent childhood scene: two boys in a playground, playing on swings, goofing around in the sandlot, walking hand-in-hand with a toddler in blue sneakers and a red-and-white striped t-shirt.

But the image shifts. The next snapshot is horrific: Two boys in a basement. Kicking and stomping the toddler. Beating him with a brick. Tying him naked to a makeshift wooden cross and leaving him to die.

It became known as 'the crucifixion murder' and two young brothers -- seven and 10 years old -- confessed to killing the 20-month-old child they had met in a park.

How did the public and police react to such an incident back then? And what became of those two boys?

Drawing on exclusive FRONTLINE interviews, police reports and local newspaper accounts, here is the story of this crime a quarter century ago and the two boys -- then and now.

 


Ten year-old "Bobby" and seven year-old "Billy" lived with their father, a vocational school student and former shipyard worker who was separated from his wife. He gave Bobby and Billy bus passes to visit their mother across town and described them as "pretty free-wheeling kids." They were used to walking the streets alone, sometimes for miles away from home.

The father, the two boys, and a younger son lived in a four-bedroom railroad flat in Pacific Heights not far from Alta Plaza Park. It was a rough neighborhood. Both older boys had witnessed robberies and muggings, "all the nasty stuff the city has to offer," their father told reporters. The boys claimed they had often been beaten up by neighborhood kids.

Billy, the 7-year-old, had fallen down an airshaft two years earlier and required surgery for a plastic plate to be attached to his skull. Bobby witnessed the accident and watched as his brother lingered between life and death, then recovered.

The boys were close and often played together. Sometime in the early afternoon of April 14, 1971 they wandered down to the park, where they played on swings and in the sandlot.

rcru1.gifMelanie Alba, a 21-year-old mother of two, told reporters she was keeping an eye on her children at the park while sunbathing on grass nearby. Noah, a blue-eyed, blonde-haired toddler was easy to spot in his green Levis, but small enough at 30 pounds and 25 inches tall to just as easily lose track of.

About 2 p.m., his sister Symanie returned to Melanie alone, her brother missing. As Melanie recalled at the time, "One moment he was playing nearby...then he was gone."

rcru2.gifThe two brothers had found 20-month-old Noah wandering alone. In his 1997 interview with FRONTLINE, Bobby said they asked the child where his mother was and when he couldn't tell them, they took the youngster by the hand and led him through the park asking various strangers if they knew his mother. No one did.

A witness in the park told the mother and later investigators he saw two boys leading a child by the hand out of the park.

A brutal crime
Bobby, who is now in his 30s and spoke to FRONTLINE on the condition of anonymity, said he and his brother had had no plan.

"A block-and-a-half away, we had a little spot that me and Billy had been to a couple of times. It was underneath a building, it was kind of like a fort area, [a] little play area that we happened upon in our adventures," he recalled. "We went down there and just stayed there for awhile and played around...That's pretty much what I can recall at first. We were just playing around."

As detectives would learn days later, the brothers had taken Noah down an alley and into a dingy, unfinished basement used as a "clubhouse" by neighborhood children. There wasn't much to speak of: peeling columns, two old mattresses, a red bicycle, broken cafe chair, shattered glass and pieces of wood.

According to Bobby, little Noah Alba began crying in the dark, decrepit space. The boys tried to get him to stop. Growing increasingly agitated, Bobby said he thinks he slapped the baby and his brother joined in. The crying grew louder and the violence became worse until the child lay still.

"I think the most disturbing visual memory I have is seeing a bruised baby, and it wasn't moving," Bobby told FRONTLINE. "That was the one thing that I've tried real hard not to remember, but that's the visual I get."

Police later told reporters it was more than slaps that killed Noah. They said the boys pounced up and down on the baby and furiously hit him with a brick, cutting his head open and exposing his skull. The cause of death was a ruptured liver with internal bleeding.

For five days following Noah's disappearance, police scoured every district in the city. A handball glove spotted by a witness on one of the boys seen leaving the park with the toddler proved to be the vital clue. Police spread the description and a schoolteacher who knew that one of the brothers often wore a handball glove alerted investigators to his identity.

Police said Billy led them to the dead child.

"So I asked [the 7-year-old], if you were a policeman on this case, where would you look,...what would you do?" San Francisco Detective Dan Driscoll told reporters. The youngster responded, "I would look in an alley," Driscoll said.

rcru3.gifThe boy led police to an alley and pointed to a basement door, suggesting they "try in there." Driscoll spotted Noah's naked body in a corner, his arms and feet lashed to a crude wooden cross and covered in paper and debris. A bloody shirt lay next to him. The detective told reporters he spun Billy around and back out the door to spare him the terrible sight.

Once the police discovered the child, both boys confessed to assaulting the toddler. They said they were playing with Noah when a brick accidentally fell on his head. They explained that they took off the baby's clothes when he wet his diapers and tied him to the cross so he couldn't escape, police said.

Bobby told FRONTLINE that the cross formation, which had mystified police and the public, grew out of his knowledge of Jesus Christ and a naive belief that the baby could be resurrected, too.

"The only thing I could think of [was] I really didn't mean to do this, I didn't want this to happen," he said in his interview. "I don't remember being very religious, but I felt like [putting the baby on a cross] was the only thing to do...I wanted the baby back alive. I wasn't absolutely sure it was dead, but it wasn't moving and it was bruised.

"So I put it in a cross formation, and I hoped," he said, adding, "I don't think I really gave up hope until the police officers found it."

Child or monster?
The police had their suspects, but the question of what to do with such young boys was bewildering, according to investigators who had worked on the case. How do you read a 7-year-old his Miranda rights? And how do you prove premeditation in child's play?

Some labeled the two boys "monsters." A San Francisco paper ran the headline, "CHILD'S MURDER TOLD BY COOL 7-YEAR-OLD." But little Noah Alba's gruesome slaying was an anomaly. In 1971, juvenile arrests in California were on the decline. Few could imagine children killing children, particularly in the waning era of Haight-Ashbury flower children and psychedelia. Even fewer could grasp the idea of charging a 7- and 10-year-old with homicide. 

rcru4.gif

Public reaction on the whole was one of sorrow and even cautious hope for the boys. Some wondered if drugs were to blame. John Fotinos, a San Francisco homicide detective who assisted in the investigation, said he felt the brothers were not vicious.

"[Kids] need supervision, period, and apparently these guys ran amok, and it's not their fault, really," Fotinos told FRONTLINE. "I think it would be criminal to [incarcerate] a 7-year-old and a 10-year old...We don't even do that to animals, for crying out loud."

Even the victim's mother expressed no anger and assigned no blame.

"To kids, what's the difference between doing a thing like this or kicking a puppy?" she told reporters, tears streaming down her face minutes after identifying her baby's mutilated body at the morgue.

A gag order banned discussion of the case outside the courtroom, and media attention quickly dissipated. Bobby, the 10-year-old, spent two months in juvenile detention before murder charges against the two brothers were dismissed by a juvenile court judge in favor of therapy. The judge ordered them placed in a special home, where for two years they received extensive counseling and psychotherapy before being returned to their mother's custody. Their names were never made public.

The dual aftermath
Bobby has gone on to live a responsible life, working and raising a family of his own. Billy, however, has had minor run-ins with the law as a juvenile and struggled with substance abuse. As an adult, he has been convicted twice of physically abusing children -- including his own 3-month-old son and another child, police and court records show.

In his interview with FRONTLINE, Bobby said he has told very few people about his past.

The brothers' relationship is still close, Bobby said, and he can only guess that his brother suffered more because he was younger and more impressionable. He tries not to dwell on what they did.

"It's hard for me to think of me, today, as the person that did this horrible thing," he said. "I'm a productive citizen. I'm doing well as a father, I'm doing well as a worker. I make a living for myself and my family...I take care of myself well and try not to hurt anybody and try to live by the laws of the land, so to speak."

The experiences of Bobby and Billy reflect what experts have generally observed about the rehabilitation of troubled young children. Given intervention at an early age, roughly half go on to lead responsible lives; the other half experience serious psychological and social problems. Researchers say there are no clear explanations for why one group succeeds and another fails. Some speculate that a strong relationship with a mentor or caring adult can be a critical factor in changing a child's life.

Looking back, Bobby is still very troubled that his brother has led a different kind of life. As the older brother, he feels that Billy had looked to him as a role model and followed his lead. It's hard for Bobby to understand the way that things have worked out and "at the core," he says, "Billy is a good person."

Debate today is increasingly focusing on how to handle troubled children and set them straight while protecting society from the ones who seem most lost. Most states have lowered the age at which juveniles are charged as adults, making it possible for convicted youths to be sent to adult prisons.

Some people say treating a violent child as a child is not worth the risk to society and changing violent, antisocial behavior is an impossibility. But childrens' rights activists and many legal and mental health professionals disagree, arguing that a child can be helped with the right intervention. Bobby agrees.

"I was a child. Everybody was a child at one time, and people change," he said. "People with the right direction can change in the right direction over time. I feel if I were locked up for an adult term for what I did I would be a much harder person."

At the same time, Bobby also says that it was important for him to take responsibility for what happened: "I can say that I lived in a bad environment and that it was really, really, really rough. And maybe that helped the situation...But how can I blame that? I did it.....I can't blame my parents...

"I still feel like looking back it was still me and if I were to try and direct that anger off to somebody else and not deal with it, I don't feel like I would ever deal with it. "

 

 

DarleneSignaturePic1.jpg

"Time is too slow for those who wait; too swift for those who fear;

too long for  those who grieve; too short for those who rejoice.

But for those who love, time is eternity."

(Jane Fellowes)

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18 hours ago, seesthru said:

While it didn't happen to the son of an FBI agent, it's based on a true story.. It's based on the murder of Noah Alba in 1971.

 

https://www.pbs.org/wgbh/pages/frontline/shows/little/readings/crucifixion.html?fbclid=IwAR079U6sXE79HlJ0AvUTt2ZHbc3q73RiA3l51iTLLvIhEx6vX_ufDOZFYHE

BEER----> Just watched that episode last night -------- chilling.

BELCH

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It was very chilling.  I have to admit, last season, I was sure they were going to reveal that Brian Tench had Autism, a severe form.  He was non verbal, hated being touched.  This season, it felt a bit more like  attachment disorder,  like the orphans in the Soviet Union and other places developed because they were warehoused, and not given love, affection, and in many instances, not even the basic care. I wonder if they are going to end up making  Brian Tench a budding serial killer?  He sure had a creepy vibe, staring at the girl in the park.

"I smell blood and an era of prominent madmen"

W. H. Auden
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13 hours ago, seesthru said:

It was very chilling.  I have to admit, last season, I was sure they were going to reveal that Brian Tench had Autism, a severe form.  He was non verbal, hated being touched.  This season, it felt a bit more like  attachment disorder,  like the orphans in the Soviet Union and other places developed because they were warehoused, and not given love, affection, and in many instances, not even the basic care. I wonder if they are going to end up making  Brian Tench a budding serial killer?  He sure had a creepy vibe, staring at the girl in the park.

Good point about Brian's stare, it is creepy, and we very well may be seeing the beginning of a serial killer.  Bet they bring him back next season.  And if he does become a killer, I'm betting it will have religious tones to it since ....

Spoiler

...it was his idea to put the child on the cross.  Maybe his thoughts behind it would be, kill the flesh, save the soul and not necessarily remorse.  Just a thought.  And, since he's adopted, we know nothing of his biological family.  He could be the son of anyone.  What a scary thought that is.

 

DarleneSignaturePic1.jpg

"Time is too slow for those who wait; too swift for those who fear;

too long for  those who grieve; too short for those who rejoice.

But for those who love, time is eternity."

(Jane Fellowes)

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