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Worst Mm Episode....ever


Guest MMawagen

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  • 4 weeks later...
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Guest BlackJack_2000

I actually like 'Well Worn Lock', i thought it was a really good Catherine-centric episode. it's one of my favorites actually.

to me, so far, the worst episode has to be 'The Wild & The Innocent', because quite frankly it didn't seem like Millennium at all. you felt no sympathy for the characters involved, maybe for the girl, but all she did was cry throughout the whole episode. the only bright spot was the scene with Frank, Catherine and Jordan. Other than that, I didn't like that episode, and I probably won't be watching it again any time soon.

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to me, so far, the worst episode has to be 'The Wild & The Innocent', because quite frankly it didn't seem like Millennium at all.  you felt no sympathy for the characters involved, maybe for the girl, but all she did was cry throughout the whole episode.  the only bright spot was the scene with Frank, Catherine and Jordan.  Other than that, I didn't like that episode, and I probably won't be watching it again any time soon.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

I would rate this episode as one of my least favorites, not necessarily because it was poorly done (it wasn') but because of something you stated above: it didn't seem like Millennium at all. Sure, Frank used his "special profiling powers" but it just gave off an aura of a typical cop show. Perhaps it wasn't dark enough for me. It had a very visceral plot point about a mother and her child, the acting was pretty good, but it just never resonated with me either, similar to a decent movie that you watched but never felt the pull to view often, or again.

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For me it had to be "Somehow Satan Got Behind Me" and that other Morgan and Wong episode about selfphosophly?. Juts totally out of context. Other than that, "A Single Blade of Grass" would have to round out the trifecta.

A thought expressed by William James in 1902 and quoted by Wells deserves renewed attention: [Cleckley, 1988 5th edition]

Yonder puny fellow however, whom everyone can beat suffers no chagrin about it, for he has long ago abandoned the attempt to “carry that line,” as the merchants say, of Self at all. With no attempt there can be no failure; with no failure, no humiliation. So our self-feeling in this world depends entirely on what we back ourselves to be and do. It is determined by the ratio of our actualities to our supposed potentialities; a fraction of which our pretensions are the denominator and the numerator our success: thus, self-esteem = Success/Pretensions. Such a fraction may be increased as well by diminishing the denominator as by increasing the numerator. To give up pretensions is as blessed a relief as to get them gratified; and where disappointment is incessant and the struggle unending, this is what men will always do. The history of evangelical theology, with its conviction of sin, its self-despair, and its abandonment of salvation by works, is the deepest of all possible examples, but we meet others in every walk of life….How pleasant is the day when we give up striving to be young—or slender! Thank God! We say, those illusions are gone. Everything added to the self is a burden as well as a pride.

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For me it had to be "Somehow Satan Got Behind Me" and that other Morgan and Wong episode about selfphosophly?.  Juts totally out of context.  Other than that, "A Single Blade of Grass" would have to round out the trifecta.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

"I've learned to appreciate the preposterousness of any profundity."

Precisely why I love those episodes, because they ARE totally out of context. And well written. Someone in another thread long ago (i.e. within the last couple of weeks) mentioned about how they would've preferred that such offbeat comedy eps would've come later, as in the X-Files; let the show get its legs, then poke fun at itself. That's perfectly plausible, but I dig them nonetheless.

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Yeah, I agree they were well written, but overall they didn't coalesce with the show.....nonetheless, the humor in the first one was great.....Somehow, Satan got behind me could have come later.......u know, maybe a year after the show ended or something.........a recap of sorts..........

A thought expressed by William James in 1902 and quoted by Wells deserves renewed attention: [Cleckley, 1988 5th edition]

Yonder puny fellow however, whom everyone can beat suffers no chagrin about it, for he has long ago abandoned the attempt to “carry that line,” as the merchants say, of Self at all. With no attempt there can be no failure; with no failure, no humiliation. So our self-feeling in this world depends entirely on what we back ourselves to be and do. It is determined by the ratio of our actualities to our supposed potentialities; a fraction of which our pretensions are the denominator and the numerator our success: thus, self-esteem = Success/Pretensions. Such a fraction may be increased as well by diminishing the denominator as by increasing the numerator. To give up pretensions is as blessed a relief as to get them gratified; and where disappointment is incessant and the struggle unending, this is what men will always do. The history of evangelical theology, with its conviction of sin, its self-despair, and its abandonment of salvation by works, is the deepest of all possible examples, but we meet others in every walk of life….How pleasant is the day when we give up striving to be young—or slender! Thank God! We say, those illusions are gone. Everything added to the self is a burden as well as a pride.

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Somehow, Satan got behind me could have come later.......u know, maybe a year after the show ended or something.........a recap of sorts..........

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

It definitely does have the feel of a sidestory, and that's part of it's charm for me; a glimpse into the world of the enemy, albeit comically. And hey, they didn't know there'd be another season, so had to get it in then. :bigsmile:

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Guest madbrad

Hmmm, didn't have much of a problem with 'Satan' and 'Jose Chung', but then I don't have much problem with comedy. Can pretty much agree with negatives against 'Single Blade', 'Lock', and 'Essence' but come on people- 'Borrowed Time'! Stone cold classic!

My pick for worst episode of the top of my head is 'Monster'- crappest of the Legion stories, kid wasn't that impressively evil, topic matter wasn't handled that brilliantly in my opinion, and Lance burdened with some terrible dialogue in the 'Zapped by God' speech.

Edited by madbrad
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Guest MillenniumIsBliss

I think I'm ready to make it official. I finally got a chance to watch "13 years later" again and, sure enough, it remains my least favorite episode. It was probably tied with "Human Essence", but after reviewing that one, I determined that it was not quite as bad as I had made it out to be. 13 Years later, however, did nothing to redeem itself in my recent viewing. It is just plain bad. I think it might have been trying to be to season 3 what "Satan Got behind Me" and "Chungs Doomsday" were to season 2, and unlike those two episodes, it just falls flat on its but. I can say that it was not quite as bad as I remembered, and the acting of Klea Scott and Lance make it tolerable enough to watch all the way through, but I can now firmly say that it is my least favorite episode of the 3 seasons.

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  • 3 weeks later...
Guest Toney
I will also include "Somehow Satan Got Behind Me" - for a different reason.  Darrin Morgan may be a great writer but this episode was just totally inappropriate for a show like Millennium.  It felt pretentious...

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Actually, the themes it dealt with WERE the same themes that Millenium was about. How humans are to blame for their own damnation, the loneliness, the sadness and confusion that ends up in death.

Just because it was funny and sarcastic, that doesn't mean that it wasn't Millenium. You've got to look a bit deeper, rather than seeing that the dialogue is witty and clever and immediately think 'wait a minute, something is wrong'.

And it didn't feel pretentious in the slightest. Quite the contrary: the humour and cutting sarcasm made it seem lighthearted, but at it's heart it was a sad and downbeat episode and a fantastic look at human nature. The other Millenium episodes, with their famous quotes at the beginning (which are often unnecessary and only have a superficial link with the episode) feel far more pretentious. So really, you couldn't be more wrong, love.

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