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Worst Mm Episode....ever


Guest MMawagen

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There are a couple of bad episodes of Millennium, but even the worst Millennium is far better than a lot of other shows when they are at their best!

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Well said, ZR...i couldn't agree with you more...

"And behold, a pale horse, and he who sat on it, his name was Death. Hades followed with him. Authority over one fourth of the earth, to kill with the sword, with famine, with death, and by the wild animals of the earth was given to him." REV 6:8

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Guest ZeusFaber
There are a couple of bad episodes of Millennium, but even the worst Millennium is far better than a lot of other shows when they are at their best!

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I don't think anyone would disagree with that.

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IMO, In Arcadia Ego was a classic.

I am not questioning the cinematography of the three I pointed out, but from a linear trajectory perspective, they do not fit at all with the possible exception of Somehow... I must say that both Jose Chung and 13 years made me quite noxius and I bet that they made Lance the same way.

Vv

:wtf:

A thought expressed by William James in 1902 and quoted by Wells deserves renewed attention: [Cleckley, 1988 5th edition]

Yonder puny fellow however, whom everyone can beat suffers no chagrin about it, for he has long ago abandoned the attempt to “carry that line,” as the merchants say, of Self at all. With no attempt there can be no failure; with no failure, no humiliation. So our self-feeling in this world depends entirely on what we back ourselves to be and do. It is determined by the ratio of our actualities to our supposed potentialities; a fraction of which our pretensions are the denominator and the numerator our success: thus, self-esteem = Success/Pretensions. Such a fraction may be increased as well by diminishing the denominator as by increasing the numerator. To give up pretensions is as blessed a relief as to get them gratified; and where disappointment is incessant and the struggle unending, this is what men will always do. The history of evangelical theology, with its conviction of sin, its self-despair, and its abandonment of salvation by works, is the deepest of all possible examples, but we meet others in every walk of life….How pleasant is the day when we give up striving to be young—or slender! Thank God! We say, those illusions are gone. Everything added to the self is a burden as well as a pride.

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Guest ZeusFaber
IMO, In Arcadia Ego was a classic. 

... I must say that both Jose Chung and 13 years made me quite noxius and I bet that they made Lance the same way.

Vv

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IMO, "In Arcadia Ego" was another one of those episodes with a nice idea behind it, but too much of a bland and slow-paced execution in my eyes.

As for "Jose Chung's...", I think it is simply hillarious from beginning to end. Darin Morgan picks up his title character seamlessly from The X-Files and brings his wit onto Frank Black and his work. Deliciously layered with subtext and irony, it is endlessly quotable and darkly comic.

JMOs of course, but I found it far less noxious than "The Hand of Saint Sebastian".

I would agree, however, that "...Thirteen Years Later" was somewhat less successful.

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I thought Luminary was excellent, particularly for its portrayal of Catherine trying to understand and make sense of Frank and their marriage. As far as the main thrust of Frank's journey up into Alaska, I thought it was solid, but again, I liked the secondary plot a bit more.

I am not criticizing the brilliance of an episode like Somehow Satan or Jose Chung's (particularly the former one), it's just that is not what MM was about.

A thought expressed by William James in 1902 and quoted by Wells deserves renewed attention: [Cleckley, 1988 5th edition]

Yonder puny fellow however, whom everyone can beat suffers no chagrin about it, for he has long ago abandoned the attempt to “carry that line,” as the merchants say, of Self at all. With no attempt there can be no failure; with no failure, no humiliation. So our self-feeling in this world depends entirely on what we back ourselves to be and do. It is determined by the ratio of our actualities to our supposed potentialities; a fraction of which our pretensions are the denominator and the numerator our success: thus, self-esteem = Success/Pretensions. Such a fraction may be increased as well by diminishing the denominator as by increasing the numerator. To give up pretensions is as blessed a relief as to get them gratified; and where disappointment is incessant and the struggle unending, this is what men will always do. The history of evangelical theology, with its conviction of sin, its self-despair, and its abandonment of salvation by works, is the deepest of all possible examples, but we meet others in every walk of life….How pleasant is the day when we give up striving to be young—or slender! Thank God! We say, those illusions are gone. Everything added to the self is a burden as well as a pride.

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