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ModernDayMoriarty

Did Frank 'see The Light' In Season 3?

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Was Season 3 supposed to be the Season that Frank Black became a man in black. Black robes that is; would he have become a man of God? Putting aside the virtual Season Four (no malice intended but it isn't Canon), do you think Season 4 would have seen Frank adopting a more active religious role? By that I mean, would Frank now turn to worship of God in some form or other? Look at the evidence of Season 3...

The Innocents/Exegesis

In these episode, Frank ponders that at the turn of the last Millennium, the world may very well have been near its end. Instead, a new vivacity and purpose led to the erection of the churchs and a new beginning, a new future was dreamed up. Religion and its trappings gave faith and purpose that avoided a potential calamity.

TEOTWAWKI.

Frank's monolgue at the end sees him reflecting on his path. According to the Group and to the suvivialists, they have absolute proof that the end is near. Frank has heard this and still refuses to join with them. Why is he doing that he wonders? Because he doesn't believe basic humanity and decency should be sacrificed to survive at any cost. Such a course may be extremely foolish; who will care what bleeding hearts said and did when they perish in the fires of the end? God will care he considers and maybe that is enough...

Borrowed Time.

Being reasonably certain that Samiel (or however his name is spelt today), is an angel similar if not in fact the same as in 'Powers, Principlaities...), Frank prays to God to call off his servant and help him. Frank believes he has always tried to be a good man, tried his best with no anticipation of any kind of reward or even any real belief in the Almighty. But now he knows angels and devils exist, he seems to suggest here that he has mentally sided with the forces of Order. Moreover, his prayers seem to be answered. Samiel sacrfices himself for Jordan and Frank and also allows a message from Catherine to be delivered. Can Frank really continue to be neutral after this? It would seem rather ungrateful would it not?

The Sound of Snow.

Frank appears to be judged in this episode to determine how much of the guilt he feels over Catherine's death is really deserved and how much is just him punishing himself. He passes though Saint Peter's Gate and is relieved of his anguish over his part in her death. His purpose is renewed with a reassurance from catherine that he was right to leave the Group.

Antipas.

Frank is tempted and terrorised by demonic forces once again. Evil wants him and desires him but he turns his back on it. Lucy was helpless in the hospital bed but Frank just left her in the face of abuse and threats. Like in the Season at large, he turns the other cheek.

Seven and One.

Well, he truly does 'see the light' at the end of the episode; you can't get much clearer than that really... He consults a priest, gains new insights from a near death experience, it all seems to point (along with the rumour that this was to be the Season ender at one point) to Carter pushing Frank towards becoming actively religious in Season 4.

There are probably many other examples from the Season but I haven't got much time right now and it's Christmas so this will probably be read by about 4 people until late January! Anyway, what do you think?

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There are probably many other examples from the Season but I haven't got much time right now and it's Christmas so this will probably be read by about 4 people until late January! Anyway, what do you think?

Well, I'm one of the 4 people! This is a very thoughtful and insightful comment on Season 3. Although I wouldn't personally be happy with Frank being more closely tied to a religion - I liked it that he was more neutral in Season 1 - you've put forward a very persuasive argument. If you do have more examples or want to expand on this, I'd be very interested in reading it.

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Awesome post. I'm not sure if Frank was ever meant to be tied to any religion in a traditional sense, but it's clear the ideas and themes are there. Chip J. seems to have been interested in Frank's spirtual ascension as early as his first episodes "Blood Relatives." Frank says outright he can't consider himself a believer but the episode itself, as well as the killer, sugest the power of faith. "Maranatha," "Luminary," and "In Arcadia Ego," specifically all point toward Frank's acceptance of God. When Chip J. took over in season three, it's clear Frank's spirtaulity was a major plot line.

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Impressive post.

While you make an excellent, well thought-out argument.....I must say this....

Yes, it is true that Frank grew spiritualy thoughout the 3 seasons, but that does not mean that, just because he has a belief in "God", in one form or another, that he must rely on the crutch of religion. I think, if anything, the three years he just spent, first working for the Millennium group, and then working against him, has taught him to be a free thinker. If he believes in angles or demons...or god, it is because he has a good reason to. Personal experiences that have taught him to believe in a "higher power". Going back to "Religion" at this time would be a step BACK for Frank, who is a true Rennaisance man.

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Seasonal greetings.

Well, I think that in Season One, Frank honestly didn't really believe in God because he'd seen so much cruelty and evil that it was perhaps more pleasant to imagine that there was not a God. After all, the alternative was to suffer the agony of men like Galon Calloway in 'Kingdom Come'; men of faith grappling with why God would allow such acts. As of 'Powers, principalities...' Frank becomes aware that angels may in fact exist but is also told that they are not like people expect them to be. They serve Order and Law in the Universe, they do not save the weak and innocent and if they do, it is pure coincidence. Season One is further complicated however by 'Maranatha'. Throughout the episode he maintains he is merely trying to stop Yaponchik; that he doesn't believe the stories of the AntiChrist etc etc. Yet the final scenes and his return of the phrase 'He is coming soon' and the fade to white instead of black indicate he may have started to believe that God could have a place in his life.

A Stranger rightly says that Chip J maintains this pressure on the series to chart Frank's progress with regard to his belief and acceptance of God. In Season 3, Frank learns that there is more to life than catching killers and fighting evil. After the killers are caught, victims remain and they need comfort and guidance. As Carter explains in 'Seven and One', Frank must maintain close ties to others and help others to make these ties. He basically has been a hunter, a bloodhound all these years. Now he must become a healer, give hope and allow others to give him hope.

It is about acceptance. Frank in S1 could not accept Religion and his place in the order of things (he refuses the father's aid in 'Kingdom Come', he rejects Mike Atkins warning that he must be prepared to do his best in the knowledge it may not be enough). All he could see of Religion was something that gave false hope, that did nothing to prevent the evil all around him and he could not escape his absolute conviction that even if that was how things are, it wasn't how they should be and wasn't how they were going to be if he had any say in it.

Season 3 sees Frank finally seeing the good that can come of faith. It may not ward off evil like you may want it to all the time but it can give purpose, strength to carry on. It can build new beginnings. Frank has previously dismissed this as acts of evil could take it all away. Now he sees that everything knocked down by this evil can be raised up again.

So as Raven Wolf said, he becomes a more spiritual person. Very correct also is her statement that faith does not necessarily have to equate to worship of God - it could be faith in the human spirit for example. But for me, Frank spends too much time talking and studying God, churchs, consulting priests etc for it not to mean a new appreciation of God. Take 'Nostalgia' for example. What is Frank doing in this episode if not offering a kind of confession for the killer? Like a priest, he is comforting and respectful allowing him to work his way to confessing to the murders. This was a man in pain, who needed to tell his story.

It could be that Frank becomes a kind of 'civillian priest'. The comfort he gives to the dying man in 'Bardo Thodol', his decision to help the killer come to terms in 'Nostalgia', his willingness to believe that Peter can be saved plus many more instances point to Frank taking on the mantle of a caregiver, confessor etc. I think it would be logical for him to enter the church because he has a renewed respect for the validity of the work they do. He seems to have no particular quarrel with God anymore... I can really see it. Also, consider that those in the church have always believed this. Unlike Frank they have not needed to walk such a long, hard road to see the wonders that happen everyday. They do not have the experience of evil firsthand that Frank has and many may still labour under unreasonable expectations of what their faith can accomplish. Frank has a clearer understanding than probably anyone on the order of things. He would be a great asset to the church I would think in spreading hope in these (undeniably difficult) times.

Would it work? Well I daresay Chris Carter and Chip J would have made it much more absorbing than say 'Father Black Investigates...' but judge for yourself. Merry Christmas to all at TIWWA and of course, Merry Christmas to Frank and Jordan Black!

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Take 'Nostalgia' for example. What is Frank doing in this episode if not offering a kind of confession for the killer? Like a priest, he is comforting and respectful allowing him to work his way to confessing to the murders. This was a man in pain, who needed to tell his story.

It could be that Frank becomes a kind of 'civillian priest'. The comfort he gives to the dying man in 'Bardo Thodol', his decision to help the killer come to terms in 'Nostalgia', his willingness to believe that Peter can be saved plus many more instances point to Frank taking on the mantle of a caregiver, confessor etc. I think it would be logical for him to enter the church because he has a renewed respect for the validity of the work they do. He seems to have no particular quarrel with God anymore... I can really see it. Also, consider that those in the church have always believed this. Unlike Frank they have not needed to walk such a long, hard road to see the wonders that happen everyday. They do not have the experience of evil firsthand that Frank has and many may still labour under unreasonable expectations of what their faith can accomplish. Frank has a clearer understanding than probably anyone on the order of things. He would be a great asset to the church I would think in spreading hope in these (undeniably difficult) times.

Those are some really great points. I never really thought about Frank's role in "Nostalgia" that way. I did see Frank, especailly near the second half of season three taking on many Christ-like attributes in his relations to other people. He seems peaceful and loving but at the same time fierce and intolerant of evil. The contradictary nature of Christ's character in the gospels is one of the things that makes him so interesting to me. Frank believes Peter can be forgiven, he learns to turn the other cheak but at the same time Frank would kill Peter. Frank seems to be at peace but not a false peace, something more. I love in "Nostalgia" when the Sheriff protests he simply says"He did it. I don't know what you want me to say." There is a kind of authority he speaks with there.

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taking on the mantle of a caregiver

Very key point here. Great thread to contemplate during this season as many of us spend time around the Christmas tree near our computers, introspecting into the kalediscope of brilliant colors.

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Frank is in a classic battle for his soul. He progresses from a doubter to one who sees evil (lucy) for what it is is. He and Catherine had interesting discussions on their nonbelief in season one. And continued to debate about it.

Lucy/Pepper/ Satan strive to get Frank to join their side. He refuses, and contiues to be drawn to the Bible and the church. I do think Frank finally accepts the gospel in season three. He seems to have a new resolve after spending time with the preist or pastor.

Another clue to the show's premise is "somehow satan got behind me" That is a clear examination of what is behind the evil in the series. It is also an excellant illustration of the ideas in C.S. Lewis's "Screwtape Letters"

I think Frank won his battle with evil.

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