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Dead Letters


Guest MillenniumIsBliss

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Guest ___ L@the_of_Heaven___
I think the increase fits right in with the psychological profile of the culture we live in. The various entertainment media have slowly caused the viewers/listeners of their products to become used to what was once sensationally unique so that they demand ever-more graphic imagery to get the same 'rush' from a viewing or listening. It's comparable to a serial killer's progression as described by Frank (in Paper Dove, I think). As a killer becomes more proficient and confident, he seeks more to bring the satisfaction (whatever that is for him) that he achieved when he began. He may increase his rate of killings, increase the violence with which he kills, become more 'creative' in the way that he causes death, or kill more slowly in an ever-worsening torturous manner...you get the picture...

Anyway that's my opinion on why TV has come as far as it has.

Oh yes my friend, you are exactly right! It is called 'Gradualism'...

The illustration is that if you put a frog in a pan of boiling water, he will immediately jump out. You put him in a pan of cold water and gradually turn up the heat, he will comfortably sit there until he dies...

And, we could go into the REAL reasons and powers behind this (which in my opinion is VERY 'Millenniumistic') but I'm afraid that Selfo and 4H would band together and pummel my little wretched self into it's componant parts... :yes:

But, it is quite real.

It is VERY effective.

And, it is accomplishing EXACTLY what it was designed for...

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Guest MillenniumIsBliss
I think the increase fits right in with the psychological profile of the culture we live in. The various entertainment media have slowly caused the viewers/listeners of their products to become used to what was once sensationally unique so that they demand ever-more graphic imagery to get the same 'rush' from a viewing or listening. It's comparable to a serial killer's progression as described by Frank (in Paper Dove, I think). As a killer becomes more proficient and confident, he seeks more to bring the satisfaction (whatever that is for him) that he achieved when he began. He may increase his rate of killings, increase the violence with which he kills, become more 'creative' in the way that he causes death, or kill more slowly in an ever-worsening torturous manner...you get the picture...

Anyway that's my opinion on why TV has come as far as it has.

Yes, I agree, it's like they have to keep outdoing the previous film to keep the viewer spending his/her money, and it is kind of a troubling pattern. We see it in gore, we see it in special effects, and we even see it in comedy, as movies like American Pie and "There's Something About Mary" (I haven't see the latter) have to continue to push the boundaries, and have succeeded in changing the boundaries until the next film comes along to push them a little further.

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  • 8 months later...

I have to admit that the scene in the Pilot where they dug up the guy and he was all sewn up was very graphic for me. It stayed with me for a couple of days. I agree that gradually I have come to acept more violent things as TV and movies have gone even further along. I do remember stopping to watch CSI after thinking about the idea that I was just voyering (word?) into more and more shocking body images, and women with tight white blouses. I haven't missed CSI a bit. The van as a mobile killing machine was used in some other movie or show later, but I can't remember where. Pretty gruesome concept.

This episode continues to give us background on Frank's psych, and how he "lost it" in the past. This other profiler serves as a foil to show the strength and sacrifice that Frank offers. Frank is very good at what he does, and it cost him a lot personally. It also shows how Frank's family has helped him overcome his demons, and how losing it mgiht change him.

The clown dream could be there to show that even though parents try to protect their kids from the evil in the world, kids are still aware that something is going on.. even if it is in dreams of evil clowns. This scene could also be setting up the idea that Jordan has the gift and this is how it manifest itself in her at this age.

I have never felt compfortable around clowns. They are hiding their face and they invade your private space!

This episode might disapint some, becuase it goes to a more secular view of evil after the introduction of the demon character in the previous show. This one is seems to more about the psycological aspect of dealing with such horrible crimes again and again, rather than about fight pure evil.

"What you do when you think no one is looking is who you are."

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  • Elders (Moderators)

If I can remember correctly, the killer had an orange van in The Silence of the Lambs (1991), but it might have been used elsewhere too.

Although this episode might not be on my Top 10 list, I still like it quite a bit, partially because James Morrison is very, very good, and the dream sequence is so fascinating.

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Guest Moriarty
If I can remember correctly, the killer had an orange van in The Silence of the Lambs (1991), but it might have been used elsewhere too.

Although this episode might not be on my Top 10 list, I still like it quite a bit, partially because James Morrison is very, very good, and the dream sequence is so fascinating.

Indeed a very good episode of MM. I also liked the way the writers established Jim Horn (James Morrison is someone else DBSD). His mental breakdown was handled to perfection IMO. It also gives us more insight what happened to Frank in the past. Linking Jim his breakdown with the one of Frank was intended by the writers.

Also, the modus operandi of the killer was without a doubt taken from Silence of the Lambs. The van he uses, faking that he was hurt (or lost his glasses) to lure his victims into the van etc... Carter always said that Se7en was his great inspiration for the series but I like to think that The Silence of the Lambs was also a great inspiration. Well, not only that movie but the whole work of Thomas Harris. The thing with the blind girlfriend in "Goodbye to all that" was really directly taken from the novel "Red Dragon" from Harris. And I think that everyone will agree that Richard Hance from "The Thin White Line" brought back some memories of Hannibal Lecter. That's off course IMHO.

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  • Elders (Moderators)
I also liked the way the writers established Jim Horn (James Morrison is someone else DBSD).

Errr... Moriarty, I meant that I like the actor James Morrison who played Jim Horn. :wink:

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Guest Moriarty
Errr... Moriarty, I meant that I like the actor James Morrison who played Jim Horn. :wink:

Rrrrrrrrriiiiiight... Completely forgot the actor his name DBSD :-) You are absolutely correct :-)

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Guest ZeusFaber

Not the best of episode for me.

It's probably what the show needed at this point in its life -- a grounded, standard-fare, unremarkable serial killer episode to establish a base line, but realising that still doesn't elevate it above anything but a standard-fare, unremarkable serial-killer episode for me.

James Morrison is indeed a stand-out plus point in the episode's favour, but it's far from one that I return to watch over and over again. JMO of course.

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Not the best of episode for me.

It's probably what the show needed at this point in its life -- a grounded, standard-fare, unremarkable serial killer episode to establish a base line, but realising that still doesn't elevate it above anything but a standard-fare, unremarkable serial-killer episode for me.

James Morrison is indeed a stand-out plus point in the episode's favour, but it's far from one that I return to watch over and over again. JMO of course.

Although i still tend to disagree with you about McClaren, i find myself once again somewhat in you corner in regards to "Dead Letters"....i have always felt that the foundation of MillenniuM was built around the first 4 episodes, The Pilot, Gehenna, Dead Letters, and The Judge...at least thats the chronological importance i felt was so necessary to establish what the show was trying to convey....what i found to be interesting about "Dead Letters" was just how a person in this line of work can be completely consumed by it. Frank tells Horn not to take what he deals with "personal" or else the consequences could be catastrophic, and as we see by the way the epi turns out, Frank was correct. But in terms of "surprises" ,etc , it did not deliver...

Also, according to the interviews from S1, "Dead Letters" was one of the epi's that really pushed the envelope in terms of gratuity and violence. If you listen closely, as Lance approaches the postal worker's upper torso and squats down to examine it, there is a barely audible gasp or sigh, this was not scripted but is an actual reaction that Lance had to the severity of the scene...there is also talk that certain members of the crew quit due to its gratuitiousness and continued darkness....(its all in the interviews)

4th Horseman..

"And behold, a pale horse, and he who sat on it, his name was Death. Hades followed with him. Authority over one fourth of the earth, to kill with the sword, with famine, with death, and by the wild animals of the earth was given to him." REV 6:8

fourthhorsemananimatedsigna3rr.gif

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