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The Judge


Guest MillenniumIsBliss

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Guest MillenniumIsBliss
Hmmm, before my time I guess... (cough...) :wtf:

LOL, didn't you ever see the original "Willy Wonka" and the chocolate factory with Gene Wilder? I think he used the line "strike that, reverse it" a good 2 or 3 times. The other reference hint was probably misspelled, but the "Wangdoodle" and "Verniscous K'nits" were the creatures that would eat the Oumpa Loompa for breakfast before they were rescued and given safe haven in the chocolate factory.

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Guest ___ L@the_of_Heaven___
LOL, didn't you ever see the original "Willy Wonka" and the chocolate factory with Gene Wilder? I think he used the line "strike that, reverse it" a good 2 or 3 times. The other reference hint was probably misspelled, but the "Wangdoodle" and "Verniscous K'nits" were the creatures that would eat the Oumpa Loompa for breakfast before they were rescued and given safe haven in the chocolate factory.

OOOOOOOOKAY..., time for MIB's medication... :wtf:

And, I DON'T mean Joe's crack either!!! :smokin:

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  • 8 months later...

The judge is another superb epeisode! We have the introduciotn of the theme that evil wants Frank to join its side. The judge/ legion offers Frank a job. Later Pepper does the same thing, and of course Lucy even wants to have his baby. The body of the judge is killed in the end, but the evil spirit lives on later in the show. You may recall that Pepper was some hack lawyer until evil entered into him.

Using the legion quote and being a pig farmer were nice touches by the writers.

Just like satan, the judge wants to make sure that those that do bad are punished. One name for satan is the accuser, because Satan points out our sins to God so that we will be punished. You know it's like if I'm gonna get in trouble I'm gonna make sure everyone gets in trouble. I won't get into the concept of grace and how that must drive satan crazy,.. ha.

  • Like 1

"What you do when you think no one is looking is who you are."

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Guest ZeusFaber

I completely agree. I very good early episode indeed. Exactly what the show was all about, and should always have stayed about, in my opinion.

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  • 1 year later...
Guest SeanDubh
Sometimes the redubbing of dirty words becomes laughable on regular TV. I'll never forget a scene from one of the Lethal Weapon movies where Mel Gibson takes a shotgun blast from a would-be drive-by assassin. He, of course, is wearing body armor so that the impact doesn't injure him but simply pushes him backward through a plate glass window. He comes stumbling out, brushing off the glass shards, displaying a I-want-to-kill scowl and utters the line that epitomized his anger: "Now I'm MIFFED, I'm really MIFFED!" I laughed so hard that I missed the next few minutes of the movie.

The redubbing for television is usually done nowadays while they're making the movie. The Coen Brothers, directors of the aforementioned Fargo, seem to be able to have a bit of fun with that. I was watching The Big Lebowski on TV a couple years back and when John Goodman is smashing up the kids car, the line "This is what happens when you F**K A STRANGER IN THE A**!" is replaced with "This is what happens when you FIND A STRANGER IN THE ALPS!" I always thought that was pretty awesome...

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  • 1 month later...

I think I may have to put this in my favorite episode list.

As Hippyroo said the Judge/Legion is the quinessential satan in that he's arrogant, prideful, judgmental,and a liar. The thing that sticks out the most to me though is the character Mike Bardale. I thought at first he was just a duped ex-con. In thinking about it more, I see him become another judge by declaring "He was no judge" of Marshal Bell's character,and judging and convicting him to death. Thus the appelation of The Judge is passed on to him.

I either read or heard someone say that the demon Legion in the bible wanted to be sent into the herd of swine was because a demons whole purpose is to torment someone until they die. Since it/they had nowhere to go, it chose the swine to commit a mass suicide.

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Guest WhiteWolf

Interesting thoughts. I agree that Mike Bardale (played excellently by John Fawkes of "Deadwood" and THE PERFECT STORM) becomes much more than just a duped ex-con before the end of the episode.

But I still can't shake the feeling that The Judge really has nothing to do with the later Legion story arc involving Lucy Butler other than the one little comment. But the Judge makes a lot of comments and says a lot of things. In his conversation with Frank, I think it was more likely that he was only tryint to impress or maybe confuse Frank, or perhaps to even test him so that he could be better judged.

As far as what Bardale said at the end, about Marshall Bell's character being "no judge," I originally took it to mean that the judge, who professed to know everything about everyone, had seriously underestimated Bardale. And in his underestimation he made a critical error and paid with his life. Bardale knew himself much better, knew that he was a cold-blooded killer and that no facade of justic would change or hide his true self.

It is a great episode, though, isn't it?

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  • 5 weeks later...

I've been meaning to rewatch this ep I liked it so much,but have not got around to it.

The Judge may not be the same Legion as in later eps. Maybe the name Legion in demons is as popular as Bob is to us. :bigsmile: I just always thought Legion meant he had fingers in a lot of pies so to say.

The thing about Mike Barsdale I didn't understand is why he didn't run. He knew at the bar they were on to him and still he went back to the Judge's house to kill him. The whole episode pretty much sums up the statment "Judge not and you wont be judged."

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Guest WhiteWolf

Bardale knew he would be caught and put put back in jail for something anyway. He understood his own nature, that he was violent and really not meant to be a part of civilized society. I don't really think, from the moment he stepped off the bus at the beginning of the episode, that he thought he ever had a chance of staying out. He may have been lead to believe otherwise for a little while, but it wasn't meant to be. And that, I think, lends much more meaning to when Bardale says that "he was not judge." Bardale knew that the Judge had interpreted him incorrectly, and didn't know him as well as he knew himself. That right there is proof positive that the Judge has no mythical-like powers of perception as Lucy Butler does in later eps. The more I think about this, the more I convince myself that the Judge really has nothing to do with that mytharc.

At least that's what I thought of it, anyway.

It really is a great episode. One of the best of the series.

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