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What Moved You Most?


Guest se7en

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Guest F_Black

Definitely the scene with Catherine in The Sound of Snow. There are other scenes and episodes that made me think or that were so creepy/inspiring/whatever that I still recall them. But that scene was so. . . .human. It was sad and hopeful at the same time. Sad because he was finally letting her go, but hopeful because he could move on without the guilt. It was a reconciliation. It was finally being able to say goodbye. Forgiveness. Those are some of the most powerful emotions that drive us. (Gads, I'm getting choked up just writing about it)

For a few moments, we saw Frank not as the heroic chaser of criminals, or the man with the special, if disturbing, gift, or the lone man fighting an (apparently) evil organization. We saw simply a man who loved and lost his wife and needed a final comforting from her. He was very childlike at that point, in need of nothing but forgiveness for something he thought he did wrong. Very innocent. Innocence in the midst of evil. Very powerful.

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He was very childlike at that point, in need of nothing but forgiveness for something he thought he did wrong. Very innocent. Innocence in the midst of evil. Very powerful.

Yes, I agree....That was one of the most moving scenes I can recall. Lance has such an incredible ability to play both the strong, silent type, as well as the passionate, devoted, vulnerable type. Even just the small short scenes...Like in the Piolet...as Catherine is confronting him, as he sits in their bedroom, and he looks up at her, soft-eyed, and says, voice cracking..."Angel, I love you more than anything in the world. I don't know what to do." That gets me every time!

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Guest F_Black

One other scene that gives me much pause is the one in Goodbye, Charlie in the interrogation room. It's the section where Kiley describes how he found the old woman unable to breathe and made the tracheotomy, etc. It wasn't written to be overly dramatic, and Smallwood did not, apparently try to play it that way either. It fit perfectly into his character. You could feel the emotion with him. That seemed to me to be the turning point for the Kiley character, when he is not seen as merely the killer-of-the-week, but something different.

Smallwood really was excellent in that part, IMO.

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Guest A Stranger
One other scene that gives me much pause is the one in Goodbye, Charlie in the interrogation room. It's the section where Kiley describes how he found the old woman unable to breathe and made the tracheotomy, etc. It wasn't written to be overly dramatic, and Smallwood did not, apparently try to play it that way either. It fit perfectly into his character. You could feel the emotion with him. That seemed to me to be the turning point for the Kiley character, when he is not seen as merely the killer-of-the-week, but something different.

Smallwood really was excellent in that part, IMO.

"She found the other plane... and so did I."

Yeah, that was a great scene. I liked "The Sound Snow," too but isn't this thread exludiing the main characters? :smokin:

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Guest F_Black

I have to agree on Luminary as well. That was one I missed on the original airing, and only caught it later when it was in reruns. The various soliloquys by Alex are very well done, and Frank's singlemindedness in going out there to rescue Alex despite the hurdles put up by the Group is an amazing insight into his character. I also liked the interplay between Watts throughout, and especially the way he sort of secretly went up to Alaska while seemingly dissing Catherine when she went to see him. I found the whole Watts arc fascinating, since we never really knew where he was going, whose "side" he was one, etc. (Yeah, I could expound on that for a while)

Side note #1: I hated that they had an astrologist at a planetarium. Don't think so.

Side note #2: Didja notice the sherrif in Alaska was one of the androids or whatever in Bladerunner? Brion James, according to IMDB.

Side note #3: The pictures of the corpse they pulled out of the water were used in a stupid little film put together by a local (Seattle) nut who is dead set on proving Kurt Cobain was murdered. Tom Grant, I believe his name is. Half the Seattle City Council has a restraining order on him. I think we were supposed to think the corpse portrayed was supposed to be Cobain. Or something.

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Guest Wellington

Hi

There is one that came back to me: the scene where Frank is interrogated upon molesting the little girl in Monster. Not only was it, for me at least, a particularly good use of the Legion arc, but also we see a Frank with eyes full of tears, completely useless for himself and his family and unable to deter the accusations against him. Frank is in the back seat, his future is not bright and there is nothing he can do to get out the spiral of lies and blind rage (in the case of the girl's father). Frank was very close to lose even Catherine, and that is very upseting, knowing the close bond between them.

It came back because of a real life judiciary fiasco in Outreau, North of France, close to where I have lived for 25 years. For months and months (you know the speed of justice), something like 17 people have been accused of participating in paedophilia upon the accusations of 2 mothers whose children were the victims. Then last week, the mothers could not hang more of it and acknowledged their accusations were false, that they did not want their children to be seen as liars, so they tried to play it full time. The accused had a hell of a life since the beginning of the affair, confined to seclusion in jail because of the nature of the presumed acts (for their own security), ripped of their dignity, freedom, and family. Some have lost their family, for their wives have quickly gone with their children far from the " monsters" their husbands were thought to be. Such damage cannot be repaired. Theirs is a personal catastrophy, their world has ended once and for all.

I guess the wives reaction is understandable, just like Catherine's would have been. There has to be strong mutual trust in a marriage, but what can you do when you feel the other may not be what he could have pretended to be? What if you keep being supportive and be dead wrong at the end of the affair? The choice is not easy: either you can be wrong in the escape and will never be able to get the severed links together, or you can trust and risk to lose your dreams, your past happiness and your idea of the family as a whole. Of two evils you might chose the safer I guess...

Regards

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Oh there are so many...but especially Luminary, Midnight of the Century and Omerta ( I admit I´m a fan of Christmas-Stories)...and the fact that maybe Frank will never get very happy again, after all he´s been through. That´s what sucks most on the X-Files-Episode "MillenniuM". Frank puts himself into a hospital and leaves Jordan, the only person for which he would die for, behind. It was never told where Jordan was all the time...maybe with Catherine´s parents...

Oh, by the way, this was my 100th post... :ouro:

"We worry...we wait...who´s gonna see a different future?"
Frank Black

"Are you aware how often you use negative associated words?"
"No, I don´t neither."

Jose Chung´s Doomsday Defense

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Guest brittonbloom

Raven--what do we do with a broken spirit?

I know we are all trained to the idea that we can heal ourselves...but it doesn't really work out that way, does it...

There is something in "Luminary" that helps (at least me), but I'm not sure I can put it in words. And that is horrible for me as a writer, because I think that I can translate feelings and experiences into words...and I hold the halves of my self in each hand and can't think of the words to explain how that happened or how I can understand that it happened.

Something in "Luminary" is important. Can this help us heal?

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Raven--what do we do with a broken spirit?

I know we are all trained to the idea that we can heal ourselves...but it doesn't really work out that way, does it...

There is something in "Luminary" that helps (at least me), but I'm not sure I can put it in words. And that is horrible for me as a writer, because I think that I can translate feelings and experiences into words...and I hold the halves of my self in each hand and can't think of the words to explain how that happened or how I can understand that it happened.

Something in "Luminary" is important. Can this help us heal?

That was lovely, but, did I miss something?

Raven--what do we do with a broken spirit?
:thinking_big:
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