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Millennium Background Information & References (Season Two)

This list includes all known background information trivia and references relating to the second season of Millennium.

This is another long listing so we've broken it down into three separate lists, one for each season of Millennium.

Many of these references have been spotted by eagle eyed Millennium fans from This Is Who We Are, published in books or have been shared by other websites in particular the excellent The Millennial Abyss.

If you would like to submit and share accurate 1013 trivia or content to this episode guide, please send it via the Contact Us page or on our forum community.

 

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About this Listing

Under each episode's title, you will see the following information:

Season

Advises in which of the three seasons of Millennium the episode appeared.

Millennium Code

A unique number used by Fox Television. Some episodes of Millennium aired out of production order.

Production Code

A unique number used by 1013 Productions when creating the series. Some episodes of Millennium aired out of production order.

Air Date

The network premiere of this episode of Millennium by Fox Television. The show was first transmitted in the USA during 1996.

Background Information

Millennium often featured specific and detailed themes inspired by historical events, prophecies, real-life current events, news and religion.

 

Season One | Season Two | Season Three


The Beginning and the End


Season:

2

MLM Code:

#MLM-201

Production Code:

5C01

Original Airdate:

1997-09-19



Background and Information References:

Sorry, there is no background information or references currently available for this episode.



Beware of the Dog


Season:

2

MLM Code:

#MLM-202

Production Code:

5C02

Original Airdate:

1997-09-26



Background and Information References:

  • The town of Bucksnort (said not to be on the map in the Millennium episode Beware of the Dog), may be the same Bucksnort (a small unincorporated community) that is located in Hickman County, Tennessee. It is located near Exit 152 on Interstate 40, a few miles east of the Tennessee River and consists of a restaurant and gas/fuel station. The demonym for Bucksnort is "Bucksnorter". There are no U.S. Census statistics for the location and there is no post office. Bucksnort at Wikipedia.
  • According to the website of Rudy's Restaurant in Bucksnort, "Bucksnort is the unusual name of a small community on I-40 in Hickman County, Tennessee. You may think the community received its name because of the presence of a large number of deer found in the area. However, the most often told story about the naming of Bucksnort goes back to the 1880's to a trader living here by the name of Buck. Along with the items of an 1880's mercantile, it seems Buck also sold "Moonshine". People would say they were going to "Bucks to get a snort", hence the name "Bucksnort"."



Sense and Antisense


Season:

2

MLM Code:

#MLM-203

Production Code:

5C03

Original Airdate:

1997-10-03



Background and Information References:

"Sense and Antisense", written by Chip Johannessen, was a government conspiracy about bio-terrorism that seemed more appropriate to The X-Files. "That didn't quite come off the way I'd hoped," Johannessen said. "That was one of those tortured things. To my mind, the rewrites got colossally worse, and part of that had to do with the fact that the first draft concerned a much more sensitive area --race-- and Broadcast Standards had certain concerns."

Source: "TV's Best Kept Secret Improves In Its Sophomore Season" - Cinefantastique Magazine (1998).


Monster


Season:

2

MLM Code:

#MLM-204

Production Code:

5C04

Original Airdate:

1997-10-17



Background and Information References:

The fourth episode [of season 2], "Monster," about accusations of abuse at a day care center and the evil within one particular child, introduced a new recurring character, psychologist Lara Means, played by Morgan's wife Kristin Cloke (previously seen in Morgan and Wong's SPACE: ABOVE AND BEYOND). Lara, like Frank, is a candidate for the Millennium Group and, also like Frank, experiences visions. Unlike Frank, however, her visions, often of an angel, fill her with fear, and by season's end she suffers a complete mental collapse.

Morgan and Wong created Lara as a character who would both challenge and reflect Frank. "My biggest worry was that people would think we were trying to make them like Mulder and Scully," Morgan said. "We wanted somebody with an incredible gift to counter Frank. Right from the beginning, the idea was to have Lara see these visions and know what the Millennium Group was saying was true. Knowing that would drive her crazy because if the world is ending, what's the point of going on? Coupled with that, we had the Millennium Group saying, `We not only have the responsibility of knowing; we have the responsibility of doing something about it.' The knowledge overloads her, and she goes insane. By seeing that, Frank Black will have a person to compare and contrast himself to: `This is my potential fate.' And that took him back to the yellow house. Lara is a possibility of what Frank could be. If you're going through the forest, you could be eaten by a troll, or you could get out. Lara did not get out of her dark forest. When the Millennium Group says to Frank, `Do you want to become an initiated member? You're ready to move up a rank,' he can look at Lara and say, `I don't know.' And yet, he believes in what she sees and that what the Group is after is right. It's such an extraordinary responsibility."

Source: "TV's Best Kept Secret Improves In Its Sophomore Season" - Cinefantastique Magazine (1998).


A Single Blade of Grass


Season:

2

MLM Code:

#MLM-205

Production Code:

5C05

Original Airdate:

1997-10-24



Background and Information References:

Writers Erin Maher and Kay Reindl also highlighted Frank's development. Their first episode, "A Single Blade of Grass," sent Frank to New York City to investigate a death at a construction site that employed a Native American crew. The story included a ceremony where rattler venom induced hallucinations. At Morgan's behest, Reindl and Maher restored Frank's gift--his near-psychic abilities--which had vanished early in the season. "I felt last year those visions were a cheat," Morgan said. "The camera would go to a coffee cup and Frank would say, `The murderer used a coffee cup.' It drove me nuts. What we were trying to do this year was to elevate Frank's visions to a dream-like state, so he would have to interpret what he's seeing. There would be more mystical, symbolic imagery that might give him more of a sense of what's going on. I had wanted to strip away the gift for a long time and see if the show really played well without it. But we got back into that. The Old Man in `Beware of the Dog' was trying to tell Frank, `Your gift isn't gone; it's going to be different.'"

Source: "TV's Best Kept Secret Improves In Its Sophomore Season" - Cinefantastique Magazine (1998).


The Curse of Frank Black


Season:

2

MLM Code:

#MLM-207

Production Code:

5C07

Original Airdate:

1997-10-31



Background and Information References:

When Frank, aged 5 years old, and three friends are trick or treating, he meets Mr Crocell, portrayed by Dean Winters.

Once inside his home, Crocell drinks a shot of liquor and we see a book called L'Age de Raison:

Jean Paul Sartre's novel L'âge de raison (The Age of Reason in English) (1945) is set against the background of the bohemian Paris of the late 1930s. The novel focuses around three days in the life of a philosophy teacher named Mathieu who is seeking to find the money to pay for an abortion for his mistress, Marcelle. In these three days, the motives of various characters and their actions are analyzed and the perceptions and observations of others are taken in account to give the reader a comprehensive picture of the main character.

The novel is concerned with Sartre's conception of freedom as the ultimate aim of human existence. This work seeks to illustrate the existentialist notion of ultimate freedom through presenting a detailed account of the characters' psychologies as they are forced to make significant decisions in their lives. As the novel progresses, character narratives espouse Sartre's view of what it means to be free and how one operates within the framework of society with this philosophy. This novel is a fictional representation of his main philosophical work, Being and Nothingness, where one attains ultimate freedom through nothing, or more precisely, by being nothing.

It is the first part in the trilogy Les chemins de la liberteacute; (The Roads to Freedom).

Source: From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.


A major goal for the season was to give Frank's life the kind of narrative drive absent last season, and many of the episodes dealt with his on-going relationship with Catherine, his estranged father, and his friendship with colleague Peter Watts (Terry O'Quinn). Intertwined with all this was Frank's growing knowledge of the Millennium Group's true nature and the ethical situations their actions forced him to confront. These episodes made for some of the season's strongest story-telling, particularly the extraordinary "The Curse of Frank Black," a surreal, ghostly journey from uncertainty to renewed determination, played out on the silent, wind-blown streets of Frank's neighborhood on Halloween night.

Since Frank is often alone in this episode (which was influenced by the Japanese ghost move KWAIDAN), there is very little dialogue; much of the meaning is conveyed visually. "I didn't want to do any more dialogue," Morgan said. "Lance is so great with looks." The director was Ralph Hemecker, whom Morgan praised highly: "Ralph came up with some beautiful shots, and I really have to credit him with a lot of the episode's tone."

Frank's Halloween journey is as much through his memories as it is through the streets of his neighborhood. At one point, he recalls his Halloween encounter at age six with the neighborhood recluse, Mr. Crocell (OZ's Dean Winters). Crocell is a World War II vet suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder, but all Frank and his friends know is that he is a figure of fear to them. Crocell had killed himself, but now he appears as a ghost to challenge Frank to give up his fight against evil, because he can't beat the devil. "Frank's journey is similar to Lara's," Morgan commented. "That's where Frank could go, where he could quit and find a place for himself. He is at the brink--he goes back to his yellow house and throws eggs at it, like kids do at Halloween. He was on the brink of becoming Mr. Crocell. But he's got to go back and clean up the mess; otherwise he would just be giving up. What I liked is that it did seem like a slip-up in his quest."

Source: "TV's Best Kept Secret Improves In Its Sophomore Season" - Cinefantastique Magazine (1998).


19:19


Season:

2

MLM Code:

#MLM-206

Production Code:

5C06

Original Airdate:

1997-11-07



Background and Information References:

Sorry, there is no background information or references currently available for this episode.



The Hand of Saint Sebastian


Season:

2

MLM Code:

#MLM-208

Production Code:

5C08

Original Airdate:

1997-11-14



Background and Information References:

In "The Hand of Saint Sebastian," Peter Watts calls upon Frank to help him on an unauthorized mission that brings them to Germany to retrieve the long-lost, recently recovered, mummified hand of St. Sebastian. They soon realize that someone is working against them, and the traitor turns out to be Millennium Group pathologist Cheryl Andrews (CCH Pounder). Wong, who wrote the script, wanted to write a Watts-driven episode, which would showcase O'Quinn and develop the Millennium Group. "I felt that by revealing that the Millennium Group had existed for centuries and setting the episode overseas, that would give the story greater scope and weight," Wong said. "I also thought it would be interesting to get Peter excited about something that was not sanctioned by the Group and to show that he will do something like that. Terry is such a great actor, and we thought he deserved something to do instead of just saying, `That's right, Frank...`You're right again, Frank.' I thought, `What's a great way to divide the Group?' I thought about doing a spy kind of show. I was doing research on the Knights Templar and the Masons, and it seems like all those groups had other groups who were against them and betrayed them. There was so much intrigue. I realized that this is how groups act, and I thought, why shouldn't the Millennium Group have the same thing?"

Source: "TV's Best Kept Secret Improves In Its Sophomore Season" - Cinefantastique Magazine (1998).


Jose Chung's 'Doomsday Defense'


Season:

2

MLM Code:

#MLM-209

Production Code:

5C09

Original Airdate:

1997-11-21



Background and Information References:

Sorry, there is no background information or references currently available for this episode.



Midnight of the Century


Season:

2

MLM Code:

#MLM-211

Production Code:

5C11

Original Airdate:

1997-12-19



Background and Information References:

Peter Watts spoke with Frank Black and Lara Means within his study: "You know that for almost the entire history of Western civilization, this month has been a holy time? The Druids, winter solstice, Hanukkah - the Romans converted Saturnalia into Christmas. Imagine that: Christ wasn't even born on this day, maybe not even 1,997 years ago. So no one knows for sure when the millennium really begins and ends. Or how much time is left."

Saturnalia (from the god Saturn) was the name the Romans gave to their holiday marking the Winter Solstice. Over the years, it expanded to a whole week, the 17 December to 23 December. It also degenerated from mostly tomfoolery, marked chiefly by having masters and slaves switch places, to sometimes debauchery, so that among Christians the (lower case) word "saturnalia" came to mean "orgy".

It was traditional for Romans to exchange gifts during this holiday. These gifts were customarily made of silver, although nearly anything could be given as a gift for the occasion. Several epigrams by the poet Martial survive, seemingly crafted as riddling gift-tags for gifts of food.

The customary greeting for the occasion is "Io, Saturnalia!" - io (pronounced "yo") being a Latin interjection related to "ho" (as in "Ho, praise to Saturn").

It has been postulated that Christians in the fourth century assigned December 25th as Christ's birthday (and thus Christmas) because pagans already observed this day as a holiday. This would sidestep the problem of eliminating an already popular holiday while Christianizing the population. It created other problems because of the coexistence of the two feasts: see Bishop Asterius of Amasea's New Year's sermon in AD 400, discussed at the entry Lord of Misrule. The medieval celebration of the Feast of Fools was another continuation of Saturnalia into the Christian era.

Seneca the younger wrote about Rome during Saturnalia around AD 50:
It is now the month of December, when the greatest part of the city is in a bustle. Loose reins are given to public dissipation; everywhere you may hear the sound of great preparations, as if there were some real difference between the days devoted to Saturn and those for transacting business....Were you here, I would willingly confer with you as to the plan of our conduct; whether we should eve in our usual way, or, to avoid singularity, both take a better supper and throw off the toga. - From Epistulae morales ad Lucilium

See: Wikipedia - Saturnalia for additional information on the Roman holiday Saturnalia and for related references.)

Credit: The Old Man of TIWWA

Hanukkah is a Jewish holiday, also known as the Festival of lights. "Hanukkah" is a Hebrew word meaning "dedication". It also has other spellings in English, such as Chanukah, Hannukah, Hanukah, Chanuka, Chanukkah, Hanuka, Channukah, Hanukka, Hanaka, Haneka, Hanika and Khanukkah. The first evening of Hanukkah starts after the sunset of the 24th day of the Hebrew month of Kislev, and the holiday is celebrated for eight days. Since in Jewish tradition the calendar date starts at sunset, Hanukkah begins on the 25th.

Credit: Wikipedia (Please consult this entry for additional information on Hanukkah and for related references.)


Goodbye Charlie


Season:

2

MLM Code:

#MLM-210

Production Code:

5C10

Original Airdate:

1998-01-09



Background and Information References:

Sorry, there is no background information or references currently available for this episode.



Luminary


Season:

2

MLM Code:

#MLM-212

Production Code:

5C12

Original Airdate:

1998-01-23



Background and Information References:

The picture ("Receiving Wisdom on Mt. Ventoux) shown in the book that Catherine is looking through and which Jordan points to and says "That's Daddy" is a copy of part of the "St John Altarpiece" (1474-79) by Hans Memling. The original painting depicts St John the Evangelist on the Island of Patmos where he received his vision of the Apocalypse.

Credit: Viivi of TIWWA


The Japanese laserdisc releases include quite a nice booklet with each set, that give a lot of character and episode information, including air dates.

The season one, vol 2 booklet goes on to list season 2 episodes and air dates - and list episode 11 in season 2 as 'Mistery Play' - probably a very bad Japanese / English translation. Obviously episode 11 was Luminary.

Maybe a change in plans, or perhaps it didn't have a proper name and the Japanese publisher put 'mystery play' not quite understanding what it meant?

Source: Dave Heel 17.07.13

Another episode that traced Frank's growth as well as his relationship with the Millennium Group was "Luminary," written by Chip Johannessen. Frank defies Millennium Group orders and searches for a young man lost in the Alaskan wilderness who may have already died from exposure. "I wanted to write a story where Frank chose to stand up to the Millennium Group and do something he felt was personally important, based just on his instinct and his vision," Johannessen said. "Although the Millennium Group was clearly pleased with him in the end, it wasn't a task they set for him. And yet it was the right thing for him to do, and they were wise enough to see that. I wanted Frank to get out in the woods, having followed his inner voices, and have this moment where he realizes that the kid is dead and that he had been completely wrong to go on the search. It should be one of those moments in your life where you just feel lost. And then he'd realize the kid was still alive and that he was called there for a reason."

Source: "TV's Best Kept Secret Improves In Its Sophomore Season" - Cinefantastique Magazine (1998).


The Mikado


Season:

2

MLM Code:

#MLM-213

Production Code:

5C13

Original Airdate:

1998-02-06



Background and Information References:

Although serial killer plots were downplayed this year (1998), one of the season's best episodes, `The Mikado,' centers around a particularly baffling serial killer who calls himself Avatar. Writer Michael Perry based Avatar on the Zodiac serial killer who had plagued the San Francisco area in the 1970's. Like Zodiac, Avatar sends cryptic telegrams and coded messages to the police, wears an executioner's hood and robe and, also like Zodiac, is never caught. He comes to the attention of the police and the Millennium Group when he displays his victim on a camera hooked up to a website and slays her in full view of thousands of people. Before Avatar cuts the on-line connection, a teenage boy manages to print the frame, and brings it to the police.

"I wanted a crime that no police department would have jurisdiction over," Perry explained. "Who's going to go after it? Ordinarily, if there's a murder down the street, the city is going to take care of it. That's how our entire society has been built. With a murder that isn't tied to a physical place, this guy can go on forever, unless there's a Millennium Group. That was the sport of it. It also has the great beginning for a mystery. It's articulated by Frank, who says, `We don't know who the victim is; we don't know where the crime scene took place. We don't have any crime scene. We don't have any evidence except for a blurry print-out.' That's such a tantalizing beginning."

With the location of Avatar's set-up unknown, Frank is unable to connect physically with the evidence of the scene, a concept that Perry enjoyed. "Avatar cut Frank off from what he naturally does; this also has to do with the demonizing elements of the internet. It's both a character and a thematic element, because 4,000 people per hour are logging on, hoping to see this girl die. The dehumanizing aspects of mediated communication, the internet in this particular case, are a sub-theme, and it ties in to how Frank, being cut off from being in a real place, can't do what he normally does. That was a fun thing to play around with, and it works for both plot and character."

"The Mikado" also marked the last appearance of Roedecker, a character Perry had loved from the beginning. "Frank and his colleague Peter Watts are accustomed to dealing with the macabre, so as a viewer you think they're much cooler than you are. They don't have to flinch; they're tough guys. What I like about Roedecker in this episode is that he becomes an advocate for the audience. Roedecker is able to express the revulsion, the tears, that Frank has to constantly hold back. For the first time, Roedecker has a chance to see this is what Frank and Peter do all the time. It makes Frank seem grander because, if nobody in an episode reacts to the gruesome and macabre things that are around, they don't seem so terrifying."

Source: "TV's Best Kept Secret Improves In Its Sophomore Season" - Cinefantastique Magazine (1998).


The Pest House


Season:

2

MLM Code:

#MLM-215

Production Code:

5C15

Original Airdate:

1998-02-27



Background and Information References:

Sorry, there is no background information or references currently available for this episode.



Owls


Season:

2

MLM Code:

#MLM-214

Production Code:

5C14

Original Airdate:

1998-03-06



Background and Information References:

The two-parter "Owls" and "Roosters," revealed a new level of conflict among the Millennium Group, when an artifact believed to be a part of the True Cross is stolen. One faction, the Roosters, believes it was taken by another faction, the Owls, to weaken the Roosters. Morgan said that "Owls" and "Roosters" grew directly out of "The Hand of Saint Sebastian," an episode he had loved. "It's nice to be so influenced by something your partner did," he said. "I wanted to break the split we saw in that episode into a secular one. How can you make people believe that the end of the world is in sight? I tried to look to a scientific possibility. In the two-parter at the end of the season, I tried to tie those together with a plague. I started reading about germ warfare and thought, "Here are scientific events occurring in our world, and they're predicted theologically."

Source: "TV's Best Kept Secret Improves In Its Sophomore Season" - Cinefantastique Magazine (1998).


Roosters


Season:

2

MLM Code:

#MLM-216

Production Code:

5C16

Original Airdate:

1998-03-13



Background and Information References:

Sorry, there is no background information or references currently available for this episode.



Siren


Season:

2

MLM Code:

#MLM-217

Production Code:

5C17

Original Airdate:

1998-03-20



Background and Information References:

Sorry, there is no background information or references currently available for this episode.



In Arcadia Ego


Season:

2

MLM Code:

#MLM-218

Production Code:

5C18

Original Airdate:

1998-04-03



Background and Information References:

Sorry, there is no background information or references currently available for this episode.



Anamnesis


Season:

2

MLM Code:

#MLM-219

Production Code:

5C19

Original Airdate:

1998-04-17



Background and Information References:

Erin Maher and Kay Reindl wrote the one episode this season, "Anamnesis," in which Frank did not appear. Instead, Catherine Black and Lara Means team up to investigate the strange behavior of a group of high school girls. One of the girls, Clare (Genele Templeton), claims to have seen Mary. Lara and Catherine both come to the case as psychologists, and in their discussions with the girls, eventually realize that the Mary of Clare's visions isn't the Virgin Mary but Mary Magdalene.

Maher and Reindl became thoroughly fascinated with Mary Magdalene while researching the early years of Christianity. "We thought, `Wow, she rocks,'" laughed Maher. They were surprised by what they learned, that Mary, although portrayed for nearly two centuries as a prostitute, was more likely a woman of good family and reputation. "She's the apostle to the apostles. She's the one who really understands what Christ is saying," Maher said. "She was pretty much weeded out of the Bible. Women can't be in any position of power, but when you look back at the history there were early Christian women who are priestesses. What happened to them? Why was that so threatening? We wanted to play with that a little bit."

The episode questioned the purity of Jesus, a divergent view of Christ that Maher and Reindl had also come upon in their research. Network Standards and Practices objected, and the two writers spent many hours on the phone trying to explain their position. "They suddenly realized what the episode was about, and they were horrified," Maher said, "because we're implying that since Jesus was Jewish and a rabbi, he probably was married and had children. Standards said, `You're implying that Jesus had sex!' And we're going `Yep!'"

The two writers enjoyed playing the rational Catherine off against the visionary Lara, who senses the breakdown that awaits her. "We got to do a little Mulder and Scully thing with them, because Lara is the spiritual one and Catherine is more scientific," Maher noted. "But in this episode you really see Catherine opening up a little bit more to the possibilities." Added Reindl, "She has a really great strength in this episode. I think that one of the things she learns is that although she's very protective of her family, she's not protecting out of fear but out of strength, and she can do that for Frank and Jordan. Nobody is going to mess with those two when she's around, and that's what we really wanted to bring out in this episode."

Source: "TV's Best Kept Secret Improves In Its Sophomore Season" - Cinefantastique Magazine (1998).


A Room With No View


Season:

2

MLM Code:

#MLM-220

Production Code:

5C20

Original Airdate:

1998-04-24



Background and Information References:

At approx 0:20 minutes, Landon Bryce names his new cell mate "Ben Gunn". I knew I recognized it, and after rifling my book shelves came up with the answer: Ben Gunn is the name of a marooned pirate that Jim Hawkins encounters in Robert Louis Stevenson's novel 'Treasure Island'.

Credit: Theo Mistwein, June 20th 2010

One of the most frequently asked questions that viewers ask about this episode is "What was that never ending music that Lucy Butler forced her captives to endure over and over again?". Well the answer is of course Love is Blue (Instrumental version) by Paul Mauriat. You can find a profile with media clips in our Episode Music Guide.




Somehow, Satan Got Behind Me


Season:

2

MLM Code:

#MLM-221

Production Code:

5C21

Original Airdate:

1998-05-01



Background and Information References:

Sorry, there is no background information or references currently available for this episode.



The Fourth Horseman


Season:

2

MLM Code:

#MLM-222

Production Code:

5C22

Original Airdate:

1998-05-08



Background and Information References:

Sorry, there is no background information or references currently available for this episode.



The Time Is Now


Season:

2

MLM Code:

#MLM-223

Production Code:

5C23

Original Airdate:

1998-05-15



Background and Information References:

The season's two-part finale, "The Fourth Horseman" and "The Time Is Now," showed the outbreak of a plague which builds on the division within the Millennium Group and Frank's growing distrust. He is tempted by an offer to join a rival investigatory group called The Trust. Meanwhile, he and Peter investigate the outbreak of a deadly plague, while Lara, who has been initiated into the Millennium Group's secret knowledge, begins her final descent into madness. At the end, the Blacks have taken refuge in the remote cabin of Frank's late father, where a sick and probably dying Catherine sneaks off into the woods so that already inoculated Frank can use their one vial of plague vaccine on Jordan. The cabin, for Morgan, had become Frank's yellow house, where the Blacks are reunited, even if death soon takes Catherine away. "I didn't feel right leaving Frank without his yellow house. I think in life you sometimes search for a yellow house, but for Frank, it actually was that cabin."

Morgan and Wong wrote the season finale not knowing whether MILLENNIUM would be renewed. They pitched several endings to Carter, who made a surprising suggestion that they kill Catherine. Morgan and Wong were taken aback, but didn't object, especially when Carter said to leave her death ambiguous. After thinking how to make Catherine's death meaningful, Morgan discussed it with Megan Gallagher and described the scenario to her. "I told her the neat part will be that after Frank Black has done so much sacrificing for his family, ultimately it will be Catherine who makes the ultimate sacrifice. She liked that. So that had a big part in the decision to kill Catherine."

Like so many plot ideas, the plague as millennial doom emerged from the writers' research. "When I looked at the current research, I found the thing that was most likely to get us was some sort of plague or virus," Morgan said. "I didn't really pay much attention during the mad cow scare in England, but in reading about it I found it horrifying."

One of the most striking sequences of the two-parter is the third act depicting Lara's visions of the apocalypse and her breakdown. It was shot and cut much like a music video, accompanied by the Patti Smith song about heroin, "Horses," which had been a college favorite of Morgan's. He had always envisioned someone going crazy to it. "Editing was really difficult. Doing this was rather naive on my part," Morgan admitted. "Music videos probably have a budget close to what one of our entire episodes costs, and we had only three days to put it together. I don't think we competed very well with the kind of imagery you see on MTV. But I felt that this hasn't been done on a primetime, network drama. I'm glad we did it, but it was really, really hard."

Morgan and Wong have departed, satisfied with their work on the show. "I'm really proud of a lot of the episodes this season," Wong said. "The frustrating thing was that we didn't find a new audience. Some of the people who watched it the first season decided it wasn't for them and didn't come to watch it this season to see if they liked it better or see how it changed."

Source: "TV's Best Kept Secret Improves In Its Sophomore Season" - Cinefantastique Magazine (1998).